Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome

Breast and Ovarian Cancer
Breast and Ovarian Cancer

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Hereditary Cancer Testing: Is it Right for You?

This workbook is designed to help you decide if hereditary cancer testing is right for you and should be reviewed with a trained healthcare provider.

Introduction

[one_half last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][content_boxes layout=”icon-with-title” title_size=”” icon_circle=”” icon_size=”” icon_align=”left” columns=”1″ margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” class=”” id=””][content_box title=”” icon=”” backgroundcolor=”” iconcolor=”” circlecolor=”” circlebordercolor=”” iconflip=”” iconrotate=”” iconspin=”no” image=”” image_width=”35″ image_height=”35″ link=”” linktext=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″] Most cancer occurs by chance. This is often
called “sporadic cancer.” In some families we
see more cancer than we would expect by
chance alone. Determining which of these
families have cancer related to an inherited
gene mutation is important, as the cancer
risks in hereditary cancer families are much
higher than the general population.[/content_box][/content_boxes][/one_half][one_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][content_boxes layout=”icon-with-title” title_size=”” icon_circle=”” icon_size=”” icon_align=”left” columns=”1″ margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” class=”” id=””][content_box title=”” icon=”” backgroundcolor=”” iconcolor=”” circlecolor=”” circlebordercolor=”” iconflip=”” iconrotate=”” iconspin=”no” image=”” image_width=”35″ image_height=”35″ link=”” linktext=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″] roundimage[/content_box][/content_boxes][/one_third]

Sporadic Cancer:
Cancer which occurs by chance. People with sporadic cancer typically do not have relatives with the same type of cancer.
Familial Cancer – Cancer likely caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. People with familial cancer may have one or more relatives with the same type of cancer; however, there does not appear to be a specific pattern of inheritance (eg, the cancer risk is not clearly passed from parent to child).
Hereditary Cancer – Cancer occurs when an altered gene (gene change) is passed down in the family from parent to child. People with hereditary cancer are more likely to have relatives with the same type or a related type of cancer. They may develop more than one cancer and their cancer often occurs at an earlier than average age.

Introduction

Personal or Family History of Breast and Ovarian Cancer*

 Check all that apply:

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    1. Breast cancer diagnosed at age 50 or younger
    1. Ovarian cancer at any age
    1. Two primary breast cancers†
    1. Male breast cancer
    1. Triple negative breast cancer
    1. Pancreatic cancer with a breast or ovarian cancer†‡

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  • Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry with an HBOC-associated†‡ cancer
  • Two or more relatives with breast cancer, one under age 50†
  • Three or more relatives with breast cancer at any age†
  • A previously identified BRCA mutation in your family

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Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) syndrome is an inherited condition that causes an increased risk for ovarian, breast, pancreatic and prostate cancer. The vast majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer is due to an alteration or gene mutation in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. These gene mutations can be inherited from either your mother or father.

Cancer Risks for People Who Have a BRCA Gene Mutation

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*Assessment criteria based on medical society guidelines. For these individual medical society guidelines go to www.MyriadTests.com/patient_guidelines † In the same individual or on the same side of the family ‡ Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer associated cancers include breast, ovarian, and pancreatic § According to SEER data by age 70 for female, by age 80 for male.
Managing Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk*

INCREASED SURVEILLANCE
• Monthly breast self exams starting at the age of 18 and clinical breast exams two times a year beginning at age 25 • Yearly screening with both mammography and MRI beginning at the age of 25
• Pelvic exam twice a year beginning at age 35 in patients not electing surgery to reduce ovarian cancer riskgraph
• Transvaginal ultrasound (an imaging technique used to create a picture of the genital tract in women by using a hand-held device inserted directly into the vagina) and testing for CA-125 levels in the blood two times a year if surgery to reduce ovarian cancer risk is not done CHEMOPREVENTION
• Drugs such as tamoxifen have been shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer in high risk women • Birth control pills may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer in women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations PREVENTIVE SURGERY
• Preventive mastectomy (removal of the breasts) significantly reduces the risk of breast cancer in women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations
• Preventive removal of the ovaries and fallopian tubes (Bilateral Salpingo Oophorectomy) significantly reduces the risk of ovarian cancer, and also breast cancer, in women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations

*For reference and supporting data on risk factors and medical management visit www.MyriadTests.com/references
Testing Options

There are four types of tests to look for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations:
Integrated BRACAnalysis® Testing:
Full examination of the most common changes of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and large rearrangement analysis. This test is for people who do not have any known gene mutations in the family.
Single Site BRACAnalysis:
This test is for individuals who already know a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation is in the family. Before taking this test, you should find out the name of the gene mutation from family members who have tested positive.
Multisite 3 BRACAnalysis: This test examines the three most common BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations in individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry.
BRACAnalysis Large Rearrangement Test (BART): Most BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations can be found with the Comprehensive BRACAnalysis test. However, there are some much less common gene mutations that can only be found using a test called the BRACAnalysis Large Rearrangement Test (BART).
Your doctor will decide based on your personal and family history which test is right for you.

Possible Test Results

results

It’s a Family Affair

• BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations may be passed on in a family

  •  If you have a gene mutation, your parents, your children, and your brothers and sisters have a 50% chance that they have the same gene mutation
  • Other relatives such as aunts, uncles and cousins may also be at risk to carry the same gene mutation
  • Testing is the only way to identify gene mutation carriers
  •  It is important to share test results with family members
  •  Family members have different viewpoints and reactions to genetic testing
Benefits and Limitations of Testing

BENEFITS

  •  Personalized hereditary cancer risk assessment
  •  Information to help make medical management decisions to help reduce cancer risk
  •  Important information for family members to help determine their risk
  •  Reduced anxiety and stress

LIMITATIONS

  •  Testing does not detect all causes of hereditary cancer
  • A negative result is most helpful when there is a known mutation in the family
Health Care Coverage

Insurance coverage for genetic testing is excellent, with the majority of patients covered for testing. Although each case is unique, the average patient pays coinsurance of less than $100.* For information regarding Myriad’s Patient Financial Assistance Program visit www.MyriadTests.com or contact Customer Service at 800-469-7423.

Privacy

Federal laws (HIPAA and GINA) and laws in most states prohibit discrimination regarding employment eligibility, health benefits, or insurance premiums based solely on genetic information. Additionally, it is Myriad’s policy that test results are disclosed only to the ordering healthcare professional or designee, unless the patient consents otherwise.

Additional Resources

[one_half last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][content_boxes layout=”icon-with-title” title_size=”” icon_circle=”” icon_size=”” icon_align=”left” columns=”1″ margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” class=”” id=””][content_box title=”” icon=”” backgroundcolor=”” iconcolor=”” circlecolor=”” circlebordercolor=”” iconflip=”” iconrotate=”” iconspin=”no” image=”” image_width=”35″ image_height=”35″ link=”” linktext=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″] Myriad Genetic Laboratories,
Inc. www.BRACnow.com 800-4-MYRIAD (800-469-7423)
Email Medical Services with questions
about testing: helpmed@myriad.com
National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC)
www.NSGC.org
nsgc@nsgc.org
312-321-6834
Bright Pink
A national non-profit organization
providing education and support to
young women who are at high risk for
breast and ovarian cancer.
Brightpink@bebrightpink.org
BeBrightPink.com[/content_box][/content_boxes][/one_half][one_half last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][content_boxes layout=”icon-with-title” title_size=”” icon_circle=”” icon_size=”” icon_align=”left” columns=”1″ margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” class=”” id=””][content_box title=”” icon=”” backgroundcolor=”” iconcolor=”” circlecolor=”” circlebordercolor=”” iconflip=”” iconrotate=”” iconspin=”no” image=”” image_width=”35″ image_height=”35″ link=”” linktext=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″] Young Survival Coalition
An international organization dedicated to
the critical issues unique to young women
and breast cancer.
www.youngsurvival.org
212-206-6610
Cancer Support Community
An international organization dedicated
to providing support, education and
hope to people affected by cancer.
www.cancersupportcommunity.org
202-659-9709[/content_box][/content_boxes][/one_half]

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2018-07-27T22:54:29+00:00