Coronavirus COVID-19 Testing Available in Arizona2020-11-23T16:48:23+00:00

TESTING AVAILABLE FOR ALL REGARDLESS OF SYMPTOMS, TRAVEL HISTORY OR EXPOSURE

COVID-19 Test Sites (Click to Schedule)

  • Northeast Arizona

    • New sites coming soon!

  • Southwest Arizona

    • New sites coming soon!

  • Our test sites collect samples for diagnostic testing. This is to test for active COVID-19 infection.
  • Samples are collected via the anterior nares. This is a non-invasive collection method designed to limit patient discomfort and minimize exposure to healthcare providers.
  • Per patient request, we can also collect a sample via an oral swab. Please inform your specimen collector at the time of your appointment.
  • You can schedule and register everyone in your party at one time
  • The schedule shows real-time availability. If it does not load, try clicking the button to load the schedule in a new window.
  • Ensure you note the test site that you book at.
  • We use several labs currently to ensure a single lab is not overwhelmed
    • LabCorp
    • Various labs
  • We are working to open more test sites. If you have a location available please email us at [email protected]
  • An e-visit is not required for a drive-through test site.
  • Coronavirus testing is available to all regardless of symptoms, travel history or exposure

  • You do not have to be a current patient, testing is open to all

  • We test both men and women

  • Coronavirus testing is free to any patient with medical insurance including no copay, no cost share and no deductible

  • Test results for Coronavirus are delivered fast

  • We will ensure that your entire family or household is able to get tested

  • Our practice is established and trusted by the community

  • Can I Be Tested For Coronavirus COVID-19?

            Yes

  • Is Testing For Coronavirus COVID-19 Expensive?

          No, The Test Itself Is Provided At No Cost.

  • How much does COVID-19 testing cost without insurance?

          Nothing. There is zero cost for patients regardless if they have insurance or do not have insurance.

COVID-19 Testing Vial With Swab

2019 Novel Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)

The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a new virus of global health significance caused by infection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). COVID-19 is thought to spread from person to person in close contact through respiratory droplets.On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. COVID-19 testing can help put an end to the pandemic by identifying those who are spreading the disease without symptoms.

COVID-19 Testing

Coronavirus COVID-19 Testing Questions Answered

Yes, this is real. Embry Women’s Health is offering Coronavirus COVID-19 testing for anyone in the community.

No, you do not have to have any symptoms to be tested. We want every member of our community to be tested.

No, there are no special requirements to be tested. You can get tested even if you have not left the state in years.

Nothing. If you have insurance the test and e-visit will be 100% free. This means no copay, deductible, cost share, balance bill or any other types of charges.

Yes, for the purpose of this public health emergency we are offering testing for patients and community members with any type of medical insurance. We guarantee that if you have valid, eligible medical insurance that you will not receive a bill under any circumstances.

We want to help the community get tested. The best way to end the spread of COVID-19 is to stop community transmission. 

Our office has four, fantastic women’s health providers. Between them they have over 110 years of public health experience ranging from the Emergency Room to Labor and Delivery to private practice. As licensed medical providers they can order any lab test that is appropriate for a patient from a private laboratory. This includes the test for Coronavirus COVID-19.

Test results are posted on the patient portal in 36-72 hours. Patients are notified via text message or email, informing them that their results are ready for viewing via the patient portal. Register by clicking the patient portal link in the upper right corner.

This is absolutely incorrect, there is not a shortage of supplies that limits the ability for providers offices to collect samples for Coronavirus testing. Early on in the pandemic there were issues with the test that the CDC had developed. However, once commercial laboratories such as LabCorp and Sonora Quest started offering testing this issue was resolved. There is a shortage of the standard test collection kit that would normally be used. However, this should not stop any office from being able to collect the samples for testing. As the FDA and each lab have issued criteria on the types of swabs that can be used. In fact you will find the required swabs in every OBGYN and PCP office in America.

Yes, we will do everything we can to support you. We will ensure that you get a repeat test as soon as needed to see when the infection has cleared.

COVID-19 Testing Vial and Swab with Provider

Additional Information on COVID-19

COVID-19 Transmission

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), COVID-19 is thought to spread from person to person in close contact through respiratory droplets. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. It is also possible that a person can catch COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

Common Symptoms

Currently reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death. The CDC reports that the following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure: Fever, Cough, and Shortness of breath.

Help Prevent the Spread of COVID-19

If you are confirmed to be or believe you are sick with COVID-19, the CDC recommends you follow the steps below to help prevent the disease from spreading.

  • Self-isolate in your home, except to get medical care
  • Separate yourself from other people and animals in your home
  • Call ahead before visiting your healthcare provider and tell them that you have or may have COVID-19
  • Wear a facemask
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes
  • Clean your hands well and often
  • Avoid sharing personal household items
  • Clean all “high-touch” surfaces daily
  • Monitor your symptoms and seek prompt medical attention if your illness is worsening
SCHEDULE COVID-19 E-VISIT
COVID-19 Testing FAQ

COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions

How can I protect myself from contracting COVID-19?2020-03-31T15:56:15+00:00

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. The CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then immediately throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including
    COVID-19. Facemasks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to
    others. The use of facemasks is also crucial for health workers and people who are taking care of someone in close settings
    (at home or in a health care facility).
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom, before eating, and
    after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with
    soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
FACT: COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in areas with hot and humid climates2020-03-31T15:16:50+00:00

From the evidence so far, the COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in ALL AREAS, including areas with hot and humid weather. Regardless of climate, adopt protective measures if you live in, or travel to an area reporting COVID-19. The best way to protect yourself against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this you eliminate viruses that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes, mouth, and nose.

What is the coronavirus?2020-03-31T20:09:45+00:00

The coronavirus is a (novel) new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019
(COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly occur among humans and cause mild illness. A diagnosis with
coronavirus 229E, NL63, OC43, or HKU1 is not the same as a COVID-19 diagnosis. Patients with COVID-19 will be evaluated and
cared for differently than patients with common coronavirus diagnosis.

What is the name of the virus causing the outbreak of coronavirus disease?2020-03-31T20:15:57+00:00

On February 11, 2020, the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, charged with naming new viruses, named the novel
coronavirus, first identified in Wuhan, China, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, shortened to SARS-CoV-2. The virus
is related to the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that caused an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in
2002-2003; however it is not the same virus.

What is the source of the virus?2020-03-31T20:26:35+00:00

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Rarely, animal coronaviruses that infect animals have emerged to infect people and can spread between people. This is suspected to have occurred for the virus that causes COVID-19. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are two other examples of coronaviruses that originated from animals and then spread to people.

How does the virus spread?2020-03-31T20:34:03+00:00

This coronavirus was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. The first infections were linked to a live animal market, but the virus is now spreading from person to person. It’s important to note that person to person spread can happen on a continuum. Some viruses are highly contagious (like measles), while other viruses are less so.
The virus that causes COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in some affected geographic areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

Can an infected person spread the virus?2020-03-31T20:42:53+00:00

Yes, someone who is actively sick with COVID-19 can spread the illness to others. The CDC recommends that these patients be isolated either in the hospital or at home (depending on how sick they are) until they are better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others.

How long someone is actively sick can vary so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made on a case by case basis in consultation with healthcare providers, infection prevention and control experts, and public health officials and involves considering specifics of each situation including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and results of laboratory testing for that patient.

Current CDC guidance for when it is OK to release someone from isolation is made on a case by case basis and includes meeting all of the following requirements:
• The patient is free from fever without the use of fever-reducing medications.
• The patient is no longer showing symptoms, including cough.
• The patient has tested negative on at least two consecutive respiratory specimens collected at least 24 hours apart.

Am I at risk for contracting the COVID-19 virus in the United States?2020-03-31T20:44:36+00:00

This is a rapidly evolving situation and the risk assessment may change daily. The latest updates are available on CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) website.

How can I protect myself from contracting COVID-19?2020-03-31T20:47:36+00:00

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being
exposed to this virus. The CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
• Stay home when you are sick.
• Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then immediately throw the tissue in the trash.
• Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
• CDC does not recommend that people who are well to wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including COVID-19. Facemasks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to others. The use of facemasks is also crucial for health workers and people who are taking care of someone in close settings (at home or in a health care facility).
• Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom, before eating, and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
• If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?2020-03-31T20:52:35+00:00

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure and include:
• Fever
• Cough
• Shortness of breath

Should I be tested for COVID-19?2020-03-31T21:12:14+00:00

Call your healthcare professional if you feel sick with fever, cough, or difficulty breathing, and have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19, or if you live in or have recently traveled from an area with an ongoing spread of COVID-19. You may need to be tested for COVID-19, which is imperative in aiding healthcare professionals and public health authorities to identify infected patients more quickly. BioReference is pleased to offer a high-quality assay to ensure patients and their healthcare providers have greater access to testing to promote earlier diagnosis and help limit the spread of infection.

Please note: A patient cannot order their own tests, and a doctor’s requisition or lab script is required for all testing. Patients under
investigation of COVID-19 and seeking an evaluation of the disease will not be collected at BioReference Patient Service Centers, and
the specimen should be collected at physician offices, hospitals or other clinic settings.

What is the CDC doing about COVID-19?2020-03-31T21:14:26+00:00

This is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation and CDC will continue to provide updated information as it becomes available. CDC works 24/7 to protect people’s health. More information about CDC’s response to COVID-19 is available online.

How do I ensure clothes and bedlinen don’t spread novel coronavirus?2020-04-03T02:48:00+00:00

Don’t carry dirty linen or clothes against your body. Wash them in hot water (between 60-90°) with laundry detergent soap. If available, add bleach. Follow the directions on the package. Machine dry on a high temperature or dry in direct sunlight.

clothes bedlinen

Does drinking alcohol prevent the new coronavirus (COVID-19)?2020-04-03T02:26:23+00:00

No, drinking does not protect you from 2019-nCov infection. Reduce your risk of coronavirus infection by frequently cleaning hands using alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water; when coughing and sneezing, cover mouth and nose with flexed elbow or tissue – throw away immediately and wash hands; and avoid close contact with anyone who has fever and cough.

Drinking alcohol

Can the new coronavirus (COVID-19) survive in hot and humid climates?2020-04-03T02:32:08+00:00

Yes, 2019-nCoV has spread to countries with both hot and humid climates, as well as cold and dry. Wherever you live, whatever the climate, it is important to follow precautions. Wash your hands frequently and cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue or a bent elbow. Throw the tissue in the bin and wash your hands immediately afterwards.

hot and humid

Drinking water alleviates a sore throat. Does this also protect against COVID-19?2020-04-03T02:35:24+00:00

While staying hydrated by drinking water is important for overall health, it does not prevent coronavirus infection. If you have a fever, cough, and difficulty breathing, seek medical care early and share previous travel history with your health care provider. If possible, call ahead so your health care provider can prepare for your visit.

drinking water

What type of disinfectant can I use to wipe down surfaces to protect against COVID-19?2020-04-03T02:39:19+00:00

If a surface is dirty, first wipe it down with regular household soap or detergent and rinse with water. Then, use a regular household disinfectant like bleach – its active ingredient (sodium hypochlorite) kills bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Always protect your hands when using bleach (e.g. wear rubber gloves). Dilute bleach with water according to directions on the package.

type of disinfectant

Can COVID-19 spread through faeces?2020-04-03T02:43:45+00:00

Like other coronaviruses, this virus can be found in faeces. But COVID-19 spreads primarily through close contact with an infected person or the droplets released when they sneeze or cough. To protect yourself, wash your hands regularly – especially before preparing food or eating, after coughing or sneezing, before and after using the toilet and after changing a child’s diaper.

spread faeces

Does the new coronavirus affect older people alone, or are the younger ones also susceptible?2020-04-03T12:18:59+00:00

People of all ages can be affected by the new coronavirus (nCoV-2019).
Older people and people with pre-existing medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease) appear to be more vulnerable to becoming severely ill with the virus.
WHO advises people of all ages to take steps to protect themselves from the virus, for example by following good hand hygiene and good respiratory hygiene.

all ages

Can eating garlic help prevent infection with the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:20:39+00:00

Garlic is a healthy food that may have some antimicrobial properties. However, there is no evidence from the current outbreak that eating garlic has protected people from the new coronavirus (2019-nCoV).

eating garlic

Can regularly rinsing your nose with saline help prevent infection with the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:22:40+00:00

No. There is no evidence that regularly rinsing the nose with saline has protected people from infection with the new coronavirus.
There is some limited evidence that regularly rinsing the nose with saline can help people recover more quickly from the common cold. However, regularly rinsing the nose has not been shown to prevent respiratory infections.

rinsing saline

Do vaccines against pneumonia protect you against the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:24:19+00:00

No. Vaccines against pneumonia, such as pneumococcal vaccine and Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib) vaccine, do not provide protection against the new coronavirus.
The virus is so new and different that it needs its own vaccine. Researchers are trying to develop a vaccine against 2019-nCoV, and WHO is supporting their efforts.
Although these vaccines are not effective against 2019-nCoV, vaccination against respiratory illnesses is highly recommended to protect your health.

vaccines protect

Can spraying alcohol or chlorine all over your body kill the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:26:00+00:00

No. Spraying alcohol or chlorine all over your body will not kill viruses that have already entered your body. Spraying such substances can be harmful to your clothes or mucous membranes (i.e. eyes, mouth). Be aware that both alcohol and chlorine can be useful to disinfect surfaces, but they need to be used under appropriate recommendations.

alcohol chlorine

How effective are thermal scanners in detecting people that are infected with the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:27:26+00:00

Thermal scanners are effective in detecting people who have developed a fever (i.e. have a higher than normal body temperature) because of infection with the new coronavirus.
However, they cannot detect people who are infected but are not yet sick with a fever. This is because it takes 2 and 10 days before people who are infected become sick and develop a fever.

thermal scanner

Can an ultraviolet disinfection lamp kill the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:28:52+00:00

UV lamps should not be used to sterilize hands or other areas of skin as UV radiation can cause skin irritation.

uv lamps

Are hand dryers effective in killing the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:30:24+00:00

No. Hand dryers are not effective in killing the 2019-nCoV.
To protect yourself against the new coronavirus, you should frequently clean your hands with an alcohol-based rub or wash them with soap and water. Once your hands are cleaned, you should dry them thoroughly by using paper towels or a warm air dryer.

hand dryer

Can the new coronavirus be transmitted through mosquito bites?2020-04-03T12:33:12+00:00

To date, there has been no information nor evidence to suggest that the new coronavirus could be transmitted by mosquitoes.
The new coronavirus is a respiratory virus which spreads primarily through droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes, or through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose.
To protect yourself, clean your hands frequently with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Also, avoid close contact with anyone who is coughing and sneezing.

mosquito bites

Can a hot bath prevent the new coronavirus disease?2020-04-03T12:34:31+00:00

Taking a hot bath will not prevent you from catching COVID-19. Your normal body temperature remains around 36.5°C to 37°C, regardless of the temperature of your bath or shower. Actually, taking a hot bath with extremely hot water can be harmful, as it can burn you.
The best way to protect yourself against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this, you eliminate viruses that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes, mouth, and nose.

hot bath

Can cold weather and snow kill the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:35:38+00:00

There is no reason to believe that cold weather can kill the new coronavirus or other diseases.
The normal human body temperature remains around 36.5°C and 37°C, regardless of the external temperature or weather.
The most effective way to protect yourself against the new coronavirus is by frequently cleaning your hands with alcohol-based hand rub or washing them with soap and water.

cold weather

Are there any specific medicines to prevent or treat the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:37:12+00:00

To date, there is no specific medicine recommended to prevent or treat the new coronavirus (2019-nCoV).
However, those infected with the virus should receive appropriate care to relieve and treat symptoms, and those with severe illness should receive optimized supportive care.
Some specific treatments are under investigation and will be tested through clinical trials.
WHO is helping to accelerate research and development efforts with a range of partners.

specific medicine

Are antibiotics effective in preventing and treating the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:38:38+00:00

No, antibiotics do not work against viruses, only bacteria.
The new coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is a virus and, therefore, antibiotics should not be used as a means of prevention or treatment.
However, if you are hospitalized for the 2019-nCoV, you may receive antibiotics since bacterial co-infection is possible.

no antibiotics

Can a face mask protect me from coronavirus?2020-04-01T00:22:09+00:00

Wearing a face mask is certainly not an iron-clad guarantee that you won’t get sick – viruses can also transmit through the eyes and tiny viral particles, known as aerosols, can penetrate masks. However, masks are effective at capturing droplets, which is a main transmission route of coronavirus, and some studies have estimated a roughly fivefold protection versus no barrier alone (although others have found lower levels of effectiveness).

If you are likely to be in close contact with someone infected, a mask cuts the chance of the disease being passed on. If you’re showing symptoms of coronavirus, or have been diagnosed, wearing a mask can also protect others. So masks are crucial for the health and social care workers looking after patients and are also recommended for family members who need to care for someone who is ill – ideally, both the patient and carer should have a mask.

Why might someone blame or avoid individuals and groups (create stigma) because of COVID-19?2020-04-01T22:14:27+00:00

People in the U.S. may be worried or anxious about friends and relatives who are living in or visiting areas where COVID-19 is spreading. Some people are worried about the disease. Fear and anxiety can lead to social stigma, for example, towards Chinese or other Asian Americans or people who were in quarantine.

Stigma is discrimination against an identifiable group of people, a place, or a nation. Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how COVID-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths.

Stigma hurts everyone by creating more fear or anger towards ordinary people instead of the disease that is causing the problem.

How can people help stop stigma related to COVID-19?2020-04-01T22:18:56+00:00

People can fight stigma and help, not hurt, others by providing social support. Counter stigma by learning and sharing facts. Communicating the facts that viruses do not target specific racial or ethnic groups and how COVID-19 actually spreads can help stop the stigma.

Why are we seeing a rise in COVID-19 cases?2020-04-01T22:21:25+00:00

The number of cases of COVID-19 being reported in the United States is rising due to increased laboratory testing and reporting across the country. The growing number of cases in part reflects the rapid spread of COVID-19 as many U.S. states and territories experience community spread. More detailed and accurate data will allow us to better understand and track the size and scope of the outbreak and strengthen prevention and response efforts.

Can someone who has had COVID-19 spread the illness to others?2020-04-01T22:25:53+00:00

The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading from person-to-person. Someone who is actively sick with COVID-19 can spread the illness to others. That is why CDC recommends that these patients be isolated either in the hospital or at home (depending on how sick they are) until they are better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others.

How long someone is actively sick can vary so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made on a case-by-case basis in consultation with doctors, infection prevention and control experts, and public health officials and involves considering specifics of each situation including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and results of laboratory testing for that patient.

Current CDC guidance for when it is OK to release someone from isolation is made on a case by case basis and includes meeting all of the following requirements:

* The patient is free from fever without the use of fever-reducing medications.
* The patient is no longer showing symptoms, including cough.
* The patient has tested negative on at least two consecutive respiratory specimens collected at least 24 hours apart.

Someone who has been released from isolation is not considered to pose a risk of infection to others.

Can someone who has been quarantined for COVID-19 spread the illness to others?2020-04-01T22:31:43+00:00

Quarantine means separating a person or group of people who have been exposed to a contagious disease but have not developed illness (symptoms) from others who have not been exposed, in order to prevent the possible spread of that disease. Quarantine is usually established for the incubation period of the communicable disease, which is the span of time during which people have developed the illness after exposure. For COVID-19, the period of quarantine is 14 days from the last date of exposure, because 14 days is the longest incubation period seen for similar coronaviruses. Someone who has been released from COVID-19 quarantine is not considered a risk for spreading the virus to others because they have not developed illness during the incubation period.

Can the virus that cause COVID-19 be spread through food, including refrigerated or frozen food?2020-04-01T22:37:34+00:00

Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person-to-person through respiratory droplets. Currently, there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food. Before preparing or eating food it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from food products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient, refrigerated, or frozen temperatures.

What is community spread?2020-04-01T22:46:05+00:00

Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

What temperature kills the virus that causes COVID-19?2020-04-01T22:51:33+00:00

Generally, coronaviruses survive for shorter periods of time at higher temperatures and higher humidity than in cooler or dryer environments. However, we don’t have direct data for this virus, nor do we have direct data for a temperature-based cutoff for inactivation at this point. The necessary temperature would also be based on the materials of the surface, the environment, etc. Regardless of temperature please follow CDC’s guidance for cleaning and disinfection.

Who is at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19?2020-04-03T01:14:35+00:00

COVID-19 is a new disease and there is limited information regarding risk factors for severe disease. Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Based upon available information to date, those at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19 include:

• People aged 65 years and older
• People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility
• Other high-risk conditions could include:
∙People with chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma
∙People who have heart disease with complications
∙People who are immunocompromised including cancer treatment
∙People of any age with severe obesity (body mass index [(BM]I)≥40) or certain underlying medical conditions, particularly if not well controlled, such as those with diabetes, renal failure, or liver disease might also be at risk
• People who are pregnant should be monitored since they are known to be at risk with a severe viral illness, however, to date data on COVID-19 has not shown an increased risk

What should people at higher risk of serious illness with COVID-19 do?2020-04-01T23:22:33+00:00

If you are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should: stock up on supplies; take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others; when you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick; limit close contact and wash your hands often; and avoid crowds, cruise travel, and non-essential travel. If there is an outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible. Watch for symptoms and emergency signs. If you get sick, stay home and call your doctor.

Does CDC recommend the use of facemask to prevent COVID-19?2020-04-01T23:26:56+00:00

CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19. You should only wear a mask if a healthcare professional recommends it. A facemask should be used by people who have COVID-19 and are showing symptoms. This is to protect others from the risk of getting infected. The use of facemasks also is crucial for health workers and other people who are taking care of someone infected with COVID-19 in close settings (at home or in a health care facility).

Am I at risk for COVID-19 from a package or products shipping from China?2020-04-01T23:32:12+00:00

There is still a lot that is unknown about the newly emerged COVID-19 and how it spreads. Two other coronaviruses have emerged previously to cause severe illness in people (MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV). The virus that causes COVID-19 is more genetically related to SARS-CoV than MERS-CoV, but both are betacoronaviruses with their origins in bats. While we don’t know for sure that this virus will behave the same way as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, we can use the information gained from both of these earlier coronaviruses to guide us. In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely a very low risk of spread from products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient temperatures. Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread most often by respiratory droplets. Currently, there is no evidence to support the transmission of COVID-19 associated with imported goods and there have not been any cases of COVID-19 in the United States associated with imported goods. Information will be provided on the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) website as it becomes available.

Is it okay for me to donate blood despite the COVID-19 pandemic?2020-04-01T23:39:48+00:00

In healthcare settings all across the United States, donated blood is a lifesaving, essential part of caring for patients. The need for donated blood is constant, and blood centers are open and in urgent need of donations. CDC encourages people who are well to continue to donate blood if they are able, even if they are practicing social distancing because of COVID-19. CDC is supporting blood centers by providing recommendations that will keep donors and staff safe. Examples of these recommendations include spacing donor chairs 6 feet apart, thoroughly adhering to environmental cleaning practices, and encouraging donors to make donation appointments ahead of time.

What is the risk of my child becoming sick with COVID-19?2020-04-02T18:53:45+00:00

Based on available evidence, children do not appear to be at higher risk for COVID-19 than adults. While some children and infants have been sick with COVID-19, adults make up most of the known cases to date.

How can I protect my child from COVID-19 infection?2020-04-02T19:19:04+00:00

You can encourage your child to help stop the spread of COVID-19 by teaching them to do the same things everyone should do to stay healthy.

• Clean hands often using soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer
• Avoid people who are sick (coughing and sneezing)
• Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces daily in household common areas (e.g. tables, hard-backed chairs, doorknobs, light switches, remotes, handles, desks, toilets, sinks)
• Launder items including washable plush toys as appropriate in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. If possible, launder items using the warmest appropriate water setting for the items and dry items completely. Dirty laundry from an ill person can be washed with other people’s items.

Are the symptoms of COVID-19 different in children than in adults?2020-04-02T19:41:08+00:00

No. The symptoms of COVID-19 are similar in children and adults. However, children with confirmed COVID-19 have generally presented with mild symptoms. Reported symptoms in children include cold-like symptoms, such as fever, runny nose, and cough. Vomiting and diarrhea have also been reported. It’s not known yet whether some children may be at higher risk for severe illness, for example, children with underlying medical conditions and special healthcare needs. There is much more to be learned about how the disease impacts children.

Should children wear masks?2020-04-02T19:44:27+00:00

No. If your child is healthy, there is no need for them to wear a facemask. Only people who have symptoms of illness or who are providing care to those who are ill should wear masks.

How can my family and I prepare for COVID-19?2020-04-02T19:49:06+00:00

Create a household plan of action to help protect your health and the health of those you care about in the event of an outbreak of COVID-19 in your community:

• Talk with the people who need to be included in your plan, and discuss what to do if a COVID-19 outbreak occurs in your community.
• Plan ways to care for those who might be at greater risk for serious complications, particularly older adults and those with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease.
  ∙ Make sure they have access to several weeks of medications and supplies in case you need to stay home for prolonged periods of time.
• Get to know your neighbors and find out if your neighborhood has a website or social media page to stay connected.
• Create a list of local organizations that you and your household can contact in the event you need access to information, healthcare services, support, and resources.
• Create an emergency contact list of family, friends, neighbors, carpool drivers, health care providers, teachers, employers, the local public health department, and other community resources.

How much does testing for coronavirus (COVID-19) cost?2020-04-02T21:36:04+00:00

Testing for coronavirus (COVID-19) is extremely low cost or free. If you have a copay that would be due at the appointment. There is no charge for the actual lab test if you have insurance. As all insurance companies are covering the actual COVID-19 lab test fully.

What steps can my family take to reduce our risk of getting COVID-19?2020-04-02T21:38:03+00:00

Practice everyday preventive actions to help reduce your risk of getting sick and remind everyone in your home to do the same. These actions are especially important for older adults and people who have severe chronic medical conditions:

• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
• Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
• Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue and throw the tissue in the trash.
• Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
• If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
• Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects
(e.g., tables, countertops, light switches, doorknobs, and cabinet handles).

What lab will run the coronavirus (COVID-19) test?2020-04-02T21:39:21+00:00

The FDA has approved a large number of commercial labs for Coronavirus (COVID-19) testing. Embry Women’s Health has partnered with BioReference for the testing in our office. This is similar to any other test that might be collected in our office such as a pap smear or STD testing. The swab is collected by our office and then it is sent to BioReference for processing.

How much is the coronavirus (COVID-19) test without insurance?2020-04-02T21:45:47+00:00

BioReference is currently charging $55 for the coronavirus (COVID-19) test if you do not have insurance. This would be in addition to the office charge from Embry Women’s Health. If you have insurance there is no charge for the lab test. 

The BioReference website provides the following:

Self-Pay Pricing

Along with many of our other clinical tests, COVID-19 is available with a self-pay patient price to increase access to comprehensive testing for patients who do not have health insurance or for those who intentionally choose not to submit a claim to their insurance company. The COVID-19 self-pay price is $55.

 

Is the coronavirus (COVID-19) test painful?2020-04-02T21:50:22+00:00

No, the coronavirus (COVID-19) test is not painful. While collecting the sample from the nostril it is common to cause brief discomfort. You may sneeze and or have your eyes water, this is normal and generally an indication that the sample has been collected correctly.

How long does it take for the coronavirus (COVID-19) test results to come back?2020-04-02T21:56:33+00:00

BioReference is processing the coronavirus (COVID-19) tests extremely quickly. Once the lab receives the test swab they typically have it reported the next business day. Collected swabs are sent to BioReference each night. That means they receive the swab the day after it is collected.

If you have a swab collected on Monday it will be sent out Monday night. BioReference will receive the swab Tuesday morning. They will run the test on Tuesday. On Wednesday they will report the result. Once the result is received in our results system we will post it to the patient portal. You will receive a notification once it is available.

Please note this is not a guarantee. It may take 1 to 3 days for them to process the specimen. Which can happen if volume dramatically increased. However, at the time of this writing 04/02/2020 results are being reported as listed above.

What should I do if someone in my house gets sick with COVID-19?2020-04-02T22:06:11+00:00

Most people who get COVID-19 will be able to recover at home. CDC has directions for people who are recovering at home and their caregivers, including:

• Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
• Use a separate room and bathroom for sick household members (if possible).
• Clean hands regularly by handwashing with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
• Provide your sick household member with clean disposable facemasks to wear at home, if available, to help prevent spreading COVID-19 to others.
• Clean the sick room and bathroom, as needed, to avoid unnecessary contact with the sick person.
• Avoid sharing personal items like utensils, food, and drinks.

How can I prepare in case my child’s school, child care facility, or university is dismissed?2020-04-03T00:12:19+00:00

Talk to the school or facility about their emergency operations plan. Understand the plan for continuing education and social services (such as student meal programs) during school dismissals. If your child attends a college or university, encourage them to learn about the school’s plan for a COVID-19 outbreak.

How can I prepare for COVID-19 at work?2020-04-03T00:13:44+00:00

Plan for potential changes at your workplace. Talk to your employer about their emergency operations plan, including sick-leave policies and telework options.

Should I use soap and water or a hand sanitizer to protect against COVID-19?2020-04-03T00:15:15+00:00

Handwashing is one of the best ways to protect yourself and your family from getting sick. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

What cleaning products should I use to protect against COVID-19?2020-04-03T00:17:35+00:00

Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces such as tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks. If surfaces are dirty, clean them using detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection. To disinfect, most common EPA-registered household disinfectants will work.

Should I make my own hand sanitizer if I can’t find it in the stores?2020-04-03T00:25:22+00:00

CDC recommends handwashing with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or, using alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol when soap and water are not available. These actions are part of everyday preventive actions individuals can take to slow the spread of respiratory diseases like COVID-19.

• When washing hands, you can use plain soap or antibacterial soap. Plain soap is as effective as antibacterial soap at removing germs.
• If soap and water are not readily available, you can use an FDA-approved alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. You can tell if the sanitizer contains at least 60% alcohol by looking at the product label.

CDC does not encourage the production and use of homemade hand sanitizer products because of concerns over the correct use of the ingredients and the need to work under sterile conditions to make the product. Organizations should revert to the use of commercially produced, FDA-approved product once such supplies again become available.

• To be effective against killing some types of germs, hand sanitizers need to have a strength of at least 60% alcohol and be used when hands are not visibly dirty or greasy.
• Do not rely on “Do It Yourself” or “DIY” recipes based solely on essential oils or formulated without correct compounding practices.
• Do not use hand sanitizer to disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects.

What should I do if there’s an outbreak in my community?2020-04-03T00:29:43+00:00

During an outbreak, stay calm and put your preparedness plan to work. Follow the steps below:

Protect yourself and others.
• Stay home if you are sick. Keep away from people who are sick. Limit close contact with others as much as possible (about 6 feet).

Put your household plan into action.
• Stay informed about the local COVID-19 situation. Be aware of temporary school dismissals in your area, as this may affect your household’s daily routine.
• Continue practicing everyday preventive actions. Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue and wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer that contains 60% alcohol. Clean frequently touched surfaces and objects daily using a regular household detergent and water.
• Notify your workplace as soon as possible if your regular work schedule changes. Ask to work from home or take leave if you or someone in your household gets sick with COVID-19 symptoms, or if your child’s school is dismissed temporarily. Learn how businesses and employers can plan for and respond to COVID-19.
• Stay in touch with others by phone or email. If you have a chronic medical condition and live alone, ask family, friends, and health care providers to check on you during an outbreak. Stay in touch with family and friends, especially those at increased risk of developing severe illness, such as older adults and people with severe chronic medical conditions.

How do I prepare my children in case of COVID-19 outbreak in my community?2020-04-03T00:31:23+00:00

Outbreaks can be stressful for adults and children. Talk with your children about the outbreak, try to stay calm, and reassure them that they are safe. If appropriate, explain to them that most illness from COVID-19 seems to be mild. Children respond differently to stressful situations than adults.

What steps should parents take to protect children during a community outbreak?2020-04-03T00:34:27+00:00

This is a new virus and we are still learning about it, but so far, there does not seem to be a lot of illness in children. Most illness, including serious illness, is happening in adults of working age and older adults. If there are cases of COVID-19 that impact your child’s school, the school may dismiss students. Keep track of school dismissals in your community. Read or watch local media sources that report school dismissals. If schools are dismissed temporarily, use alternative childcare arrangements, if needed.

If your child/children become sick with COVID-19, notify their childcare facility or school. Talk with teachers about classroom assignments and activities they can do from home to keep up with their schoolwork.

Discourage children and teens from gathering in other public places while school is dismissed to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in the community.

Will schools be dismissed if there is an outbreak in my community?2020-04-03T00:37:04+00:00

Depending on the situation, public health officials may recommend community actions to reduce exposures to COVID-19, such as school dismissals. Read or watch local media sources that report school dismissals or and watch for communication from your child’s school. If schools are dismissed temporarily, discourage students and staff from gathering or socializing anywhere, like at a friend’s house, a favorite restaurant, or the local shopping mall.

Should I go to work if there is an outbreak in my community?2020-04-03T00:39:23+00:00

Follow the advice of your local health officials. Stay home if you can. Talk to your employer to discuss working from home, taking leave if you or someone in your household gets sick with COVID-19 symptoms, or if your child’s school is dismissed temporarily. Employers should be aware that more employees may need to stay at home to care for sick children or other sick family members than is usual in case of a community outbreak.

Will businesses and schools close or stay closed in my community and for how long? Will there be a “stay at home” or “shelter in place” order in my community?2020-04-03T00:42:46+00:00

CDC makes recommendations, shares information, and provides guidance to help slow down the spread of COVID-19 in the U.S. including guidance for schools and businesses. CDC regularly shares information and provides assistance to state, local, territorial, and tribal health authorities. These local authorities are responsible for making decisions including “stay at home” or “shelter in place.” What is included in these orders and how they are implemented are also decided by local authorities. These decisions may also depend on many factors such as how the virus is spreading in a certain community.

Where can I get tested for COVID-19?2020-04-03T00:55:36+00:00

The process and locations for testing vary from place to place. Contact your state, local, tribal, or territorial department for more information, or reach out to a medical provider. State and local public health departments have received tests from CDC while medical providers are getting tests developed by commercial manufacturers. While supplies of these tests are increasing, it may still be difficult to find someplace to get tested.

Can a person test negative and later test positive for COVID-19?2020-04-03T00:58:35+00:00

Using the CDC-developed diagnostic test, a negative result means that the virus that causes COVID-19 was not found in the person’s sample. In the early stages of infection, it is possible the virus will not be detected.

For COVID-19, a negative test result for a sample collected while a person has symptoms likely means that the COVID-19 virus is not causing their current illness.

How were the underlying conditions selected?2020-04-03T01:18:06+00:00

This list is based on:
• What we are learning from the outbreak in other countries and in the United States.
• What we know about risk from other respiratory infections, like flu.
As CDC gets more information about COVID-19 cases here in the US, we will update this list as needed.

What about underlying medical conditions that are not included on this list?2020-04-03T01:21:04+00:00

Based on available information, adults aged 65 years and older and people of any age with underlying medical conditions included on this list are at higher risk for severe illness and poorer outcomes from COVID-19. CDC is collecting and analyzing data regularly and will update the list when we learn more. People with underlying medical conditions not on the list might also be at higher risk and should consult with their healthcare provider if they are concerned.

We encourage all people, regardless of risk, to:
• Take steps to protect yourself and others.
• Call your healthcare provider if you are sick with a fever, cough, or shortness of breath.
• Follow CDC travel guidelines and the recommendations of your state and local health officials.

Are people with disabilities at higher risk?2020-04-03T01:23:01+00:00

Most people with disabilities are not inherently at higher risk of becoming infected with or having severe illness from COVID-19. Some people with physical limitations or other disabilities might be at a higher risk of infection because of their underlying medical condition.

People with certain disabilities might experience higher rates of chronic health conditions that put them at higher risk of serious illness and poorer outcomes from COVID-19.
• Adults with disabilities are three times more likely to have heart disease, stroke, diabetes, or cancer than adults without disabilities.

You should talk with your healthcare provider if you have a question about your health or how your health condition is being managed.

Am I at risk if I go to a funeral or visitation service for someone who died of COVID-19?2020-04-03T01:26:30+00:00

There is currently no known risk associated with being in the same room at a funeral or visitation service with the body of someone who died of COVID-19.

Am I at risk if I touch someone who died of COVID-19 after they passed away?2020-04-03T01:29:31+00:00

COVID-19 is a new disease and we are still learning how it spreads. The virus that causes COVID-19 is thought to mainly spread from close contact (i.e., within about 6 feet) with a person who is currently sick with COVID-19. The virus likely spreads primarily through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes, similar to how influenza and other respiratory infections spread. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. This type of spread is not a concern after a death.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

People should consider not touching the body of someone who has died of COVID-19. Older people and people of all ages with severe underlying health conditions are at higher risk of developing serious COVID-19 illness. There may be less of a chance of the virus spreading from certain types of touching, such as holding the hand or hugging after the body has been prepared for viewing. Other activities, such as kissing, washing, and shrouding should be avoided before, during, and after the body has been prepared, if possible. If washing the body or shrouding are important religious or cultural practices, families are encouraged to work with their community cultural and religious leaders and funeral home staff on how to reduce their exposure as much as possible. At a minimum, people conducting these activities should wear disposable gloves. If splashing of fluids is expected, additional personal protective equipment (PPE) may be required (such as disposable gown, face shield or goggles, and facemask).

Cleaning should be conducted in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products (e.g., concentration, application method and contact time, etc.). Products with EPA-approved emerging viral pathogens claims are expected to be effective against COVID-19 based on data for harder to kill viruses. After removal of PPE, perform hand hygiene by washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available. Soap and water should be used if the hands are visibly soiled.

Can I get COVID-19 from my pets or other animals?2020-04-03T01:34:12+00:00

There is no reason at this time to think that any animals, including pets, in the United States might be a source of infection with this new coronavirus that causes COVID-19. To date, CDC has not received any reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19 in the United States.

Pets have other types of coronaviruses that can make them sick, like canine and feline coronaviruses. These other coronaviruses cannot infect people and are not related to the current COVID-19 outbreak.

However, since animals can spread other diseases to people, it’s always a good idea to practice healthy habits around pets and other animals, such as washing your hands and maintaining good hygiene.

Do I need to get my pet tested for COVID-19?2020-04-03T01:37:34+00:00

No. At this time, routine testing of animals for COVID-19 is not recommended.

Can animals carry the virus that causes COVID-19 on their skin or fur?2020-04-03T01:39:56+00:00

At this time, there is no evidence that the virus that causes COVID-19 can spread to people from the skin or fur of pets.

Talk to your veterinarian about the best ways to care for your pet.

Should I avoid contact with pets or other animals if I am sick with COVID-19?2020-04-03T01:42:54+00:00

You should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would around other people. Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the new coronavirus. When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick. If you are sick with COVID-19, avoid contact with your pet, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with pets.

What precautions should be taken for animals that have recently been imported from outside the United States (for example, by shelters, rescues, or as personal pets)?2020-04-03T01:48:55+00:00

Imported animals will need to meet CDC and USDA requirements for entering the United States. At this time, there is no evidence that companion animals, including pets and service animals, can spread COVID-19. As with any animal introduced to a new environment, animals recently imported should be observed daily for signs of illness. If an animal becomes ill, the animal should be examined by a veterinarian. Call your local veterinary clinic before bringing the animal into the clinic and let them know that the animal was recently imported from another country.

This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.

While school’s out, can my child hang out with their friends?2020-04-03T01:52:27+00:00

• The key to slowing the spread of COVID-19 is to practice social distancing. While school is out, children should not have in-person playdates with children from other households. If children are playing outside their own homes, it is essential that they remain 6 feet from anyone who is not in their own household.
• To help children maintain social connections while social distancing, help your children have supervised phone calls or video chats with their friends.
• Make sure children practice everyday preventive behaviors, such as washing their hands often with soap and water. Remember, if children meet outside of school in groups, it can put everyone at risk.
∙Revise spring break plans if they included non-essential travel.
• Information about COVID-19 in children is somewhat limited, but current data suggest children with COVID-19 may only have mild symptoms. However, they can still pass this virus onto others who may be at higher risk, including older adults and people who have serious underlying medical conditions.

What is an antibody?2020-05-15T17:14:19+00:00

An antibody (also known as an immunoglobulin) is part of our body’s response to a foreign molecule or pathogen (also known as an antigen) such as a virus or bacterium. This is valuable to fight off infection. Protective antibodies can provide immunity so we do not become reinfected with the same viruses or bacteria. Antibodies are vital for our health.

Yet, we don’t always develop antibodies—or the right or sufficient antibodies—to fight off all infectious diseases. For example, people infected with HIV or hepatitis C virus do not usually develop protective antibodies.

Are there different types of antibodies?2020-05-15T17:48:55+00:00

Yes, there are five primary classes of antibodies. Of those, IgG, IgM, and IgA are often used as part of infectious disease serology testing.

  • IgG antibodies are found in all body fluids. They account for 75 to 80 percent of all antibodies. IgG antibodies are essential in fighting bacterial and viral infections, and when present indicate that someone has previously been exposed to a particular antigen and has developed an immune response. In general, these antibodies usually appear 10-14 days after symptom onset.
  • IgM antibodies are found in blood and lymph fluid and are the first type of antibody made in response to an infection, usually detectable within 3-7 days from the start of the infection.
  • IgA antibodies play a crucial role in the immune function of mucous membranes, such as the respiratory epithelium, but is also found in the blood. These antibodies also appear early in the infection process (3-7 days).
What is the difference between molecular PCR testing and antibody testing for COVID-19?2020-05-15T17:50:29+00:00

Molecular PCR tests are used to directly detect the presence of the virus, rather than the presence of the body’s immune response, or antibodies. By detecting viral RNA, which will be present in the body before antibodies form, the molecular PCR tests can tell whether someone has the virus very early on and whether they are infectious. An antibody test tells us what proportion of the population has been infected. It won’t tell you who is infected, because the antibodies are generated after a week or two, after which time the virus should have been cleared from the system. But it tells you who has been infected and who is likely to be immune to the virus.

What is the clinical value of antibody testing?2020-05-15T17:53:10+00:00

Antibody testing measures the body’s immune response to an infection and can provide insights into an individual’s prior exposure to COVID-19 and may indicate a prior infection which may be resolved or is still resolving, and/or protection against re-infection (“protective immunity”).

What other valuable information can antibody testing provide?2020-05-15T17:55:27+00:00

According to a recent white paper summary issued by the American Clinical Laboratory Association (ACLA), when used appropriately, antibody testing may help determine the number of individuals who have been infected with SARS-CoV-2. By supporting screening for individuals using serology, healthcare professionals can provide a more detailed assessment regarding the true rate of infection and gain a better understanding of the case fatality rate to help inform public health strategies. Serologic testing also potentially could be used to support future vaccine development and contact tracing (the process of identification of persons who may have come into contact with an infected person and subsequent collection of further information about these contacts) to stop the spread of the infection in the community.

What are the different types of antibodies that can be tested for COVID-19?2020-05-15T17:56:53+00:00

There are three types of antibodies that can be measured: IgA, IgM, and IgG.

Once infected with SARS-CoV-2, do all patients make antibodies?2020-05-15T18:01:06+00:00

It takes time to develop an immune response with the development of antibodies. Generally, most people form antibodies except those who are either immunocompromised or IgG deficient. Testing too soon will lead to a negative antibody test result. There is insufficient scientific information to understand the variation of timing and amount of antibody that develops to the SARS-CoV-2 virus that can be applied to all patients. Yet, we have experience with other viruses and can apply these learnings to SARS-CoV-2 until we know more.

Studies have begun measuring the seroconversion in SARS-CoV-2 patients. In one such study, 173 hospitalized patients in China, all patients (100%) developed antibodies against SARS-CoV-2.1 The median time to have detectable antibodies (called seroconversion) was 11 to 14 days, depending upon the type of immunoglobulin. (The median time is the number of days when 50% of those tested positive after the onset of symptoms.) 94% and 80% demonstrated seroconversion with IgM and IgG, respectively, by day 15 after the onset of symptoms. This study provides information from a small number of patients; larger studies are needed.

Findings from an antibody study of patients infected with a related virus to SARS-CoV-2 (namely the SARS-CoV outbreak in 2002-2003) demonstrated that among 176 patients who had severe acute respiratory syndrome, SARS-specific antibodies were maintained for an average of 2 years, and significant reduction of immunoglobulin G–positive percentage and titers occurred in the third year.2

How are the antibody tests used for SARS-CoV-2?2020-05-15T18:02:32+00:00

SARS-CoV-2 antibody tests are designed to detect specific antibodies against this virus. A positive IgG antibody test result suggests past exposure and may indicate a prior infection which may be resolved or is still resolving, and/or protection against re-infection (“protective immunity”).

A diagnosis, in general, is to rule in or to rule out the presence of a medical condition. Again, the SARS-CoV-2 antibody test cannot be used to rule in or rule out active COVID-19 infection.

To date, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not required a review of information about any specific antibody test. The FDA is allowing laboratories to perform these tests without extensive review in response to the COVID-19 pandemic emergency.

Will the US FDA review SARS-CoV-2 antibody tests?2020-05-15T18:04:58+00:00

This test has been authorized by the FDA under Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for use by authorized laboratories such as Sonora Quest.

How should SARS-CoV-2 antibody tests be interpreted?2020-05-15T18:06:37+00:00

A positive IgG antibody test result suggests recent or prior infection with SARS-CoV-2. It usually takes at least 10 days after symptom onset for IgG detectable levels to be reached. Patients tested prior to this time may be negative for SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies. An IgG positive result may suggest an immune response to primary infection with SARS-CoV-2, but the relationship between IgG positivity and immunity to SARS-CoV-2 has not yet been firmly established. At this time, a positive IgG result has not been shown to indicate immunity, as such social distancing, also called “physical distancing,” should still be followed to assure that we continue to protect ourselves, our family, and our community.

A positive IgM and/or IgA test result, with a positive/negative IgG result, may indicate an active COVID-19 infection. A negative IgM and/or IgA antibody test result is likely to indicate that: (1) the person has not been infected with SARS-CoV-2 or (2) the person has been infected but there has not been enough time to produce an IgM and/or IgA response. Antibody tests have not been shown to definitively diagnose or exclude SARS-CoV-2 infection.

The presence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies has been demonstrated in patients with undetectable viral RNA. Therefore, testing asymptomatic healthcare workers or patients with negative molecular diagnostic test results with antibody tests may add value in determining whether they have been exposed to SARS-CoV-2 or not.

What does it mean if I have a positive IgG antibody test and I have symptoms of a COVID-19 infection?2020-05-15T18:07:51+00:00

If you have IgG antibodies and you have symptoms, you likely have an active infection, you may infect others, and you may need to seek medical attention.

How will SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing be used to understand community spread of the virus?2020-05-15T18:09:46+00:00

While there is a lot of uncertainty with this new virus, it is also possible that, over time, broad use of antibody tests and clinical follow-up will provide the medical community with more information about how safely someone who has recovered from the virus can be exposed to it again.

What is the definition of “symptomatic”?2020-05-15T18:11:28+00:00

We are defining “symptomatic” per CDC guidelines3: including (1) fever, measured as temperature > 100.3 °F, or subjective fever based on clinical judgment; and (2) respiratory symptoms, including cough, shortness of breath, and sore throat. Medical evaluation may be recommended for lower temperatures or other symptoms based on an assessment by public health authorities.

Is the Sonora Quest antibody test FDA approved?2020-05-15T18:14:10+00:00

This test has been authorized by the FDA under Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for use by authorized laboratories such as Sonora Quest.

How does the accuracy of Sonora Quest’s SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody testing performance characteristics compare to other common virology antibody tests routinely performed at Sonora Quest?2020-05-15T18:17:09+00:00

Sonora Quest is implementing an immunoassay such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We perform our own validation using stringent acceptability criteria for precision, reproducibility, accuracy, method comparison, cross-reactivity, and clinical performance before starting patient testing. The accuracy of Sonora Quest’s SARS-CoV-2 serology testing performance characteristics is on par with other common virology antibody tests routinely performed at Sonora Quest (eg, Measles, Mumps, Rubella).

Which assay is Sonora Quest using to conduct antibody testing for COVID-19?2020-05-15T18:19:39+00:00

In order to maximize our capacity and flexibility for testing in this time of need, Sonora Quest is utilizing technologies developed by EuroIMMUN to perform antibody testing for COVID-19.

Are there differences between the types of serological testing for IgG?2020-05-15T18:20:26+00:00

The serological IgG assay that Sonora Quest offers is validated to be highly specific for SARS-CoV-2. For this validated assay, a positive result indicates a high likelihood of prior infection and that a person has mounted an immune response. Different assays target different viral proteins. Some assays detect antibodies to nucleocapsid and others detect spike proteins. Spike and nucleocapsid assays are highly correlated with each other. As additional research is conducted and vaccines potentially emerge, Sonora Quest will tailor SARS-CoV-2 testing offerings to be informed by evolving information.

How will the Sonora Quest SARS-CoV-2 antibody test results be reported?2020-05-15T18:23:05+00:00

We will report the results qualitatively. There will be 3 results: Positive, Equivocal, and Negative. Each result will carry a comment consistent with the FDA guidelines. As the IgG test is used to detect prior exposure to the virus, and not to diagnose active infection, this test is not a Priority test and providers will not be contacted to discuss results. Providers should obtain results via standard processes.

What does a positive IgG result mean?2020-05-15T18:24:10+00:00

This suggests a person has not been exposed to SARS-CoV-2 or has been exposed very recently (antibodies have not yet been produced).

What does a negative IgG result mean?2020-05-15T18:25:29+00:00

This suggests a person has not been exposed to SARS-CoV-2 or has been exposed very recently (antibodies have not yet been produced).

What does an equivocal IgG test result mean?2020-05-15T18:26:44+00:00

An equivocal IgG result may occur before an adequate antibody level has developed or maybe a cross-reaction. Retesting should be considered in 1-2 weeks if clinically indicated.

What is the clinical significance of IgG antibody testing?2020-05-15T18:29:12+00:00

The presence of IgG indicates prior exposure to SARs-CoV-2, a prior infection that may be resolved or is still resolving, and protection against reinfection (“protective immunity”). At this time, we have not established the duration of immunity. However, in previous viral outbreaks of SARS (SARS-CoV), IgG has been shown to provide immunity for up to 2 years. In most other viral diseases, IgG responses measurable by serological testing positively correlate with some level of protective immunity. An animal study of SARS-CoV-2 demonstrated protective immunity after infection. Early human studies demonstrate the development of protective/neutralizing antibody responses in individuals infected with SARS-CoV-2.

What is the role of serology in return to work/return to daily life decisions?2020-05-15T18:31:31+00:00

Our position at Sonora Quest is that antibody testing is an important tool in assessing potential risk and fostering a safer environment for all of us. We look forward to additional science to establish clearly the role of antibody testing in inferring immunity for COVID-19. Other respiratory illnesses, including SARS, a cousin coronavirus of COVID-19, has been shown to produce antibodies that can be assessed via lab testing to infer immune protection for a period of time. We encourage all individuals, regardless of their antibody response/test result, to continue to practice safety and health measures, such as social distancing, to further minimize risk.

Has there been public guidance issued to healthcare providers on the clinical use of SARS-CoV-2 serology testing?2020-05-15T18:38:06+00:00

Yes. In a letter issued on April 17, 2020, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommended that healthcare providers continue to use serological tests intended to detect antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 to help identify people who may have been exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus or have recovered from the COVID-19 infection. In its guidance, the FDA referenced that experience with other viruses suggests that individuals whose blood contains IgG antibodies associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection—provided they are recovered and not currently infected with the virus—may be able to resume work and other daily activities in society. They may also be eligible to serve as potential donors of convalescent plasma to aid in the treatment of those infected with COVID-19.

What is the test name and test code?2020-05-15T18:39:28+00:00

The test name for IgG antibody testing is Coronavirus COVID-19 SARS-CoV-2 Antibody IgG. The test code is 907097.

What is the SARS-CoV-2 antibody test from Sonora Quest?2020-05-15T18:41:17+00:00

The Coronavirus COVID-19 SARS-CoV-2 Antibody IgG test is a qualitative test to detect IgG antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 virus in your blood. The test code 907097 includes testing for the IgG antibody only and will provide insight into whether an individual has previously been exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus and may indicate a prior infection that may be resolved or is still resolving, and/or protection against re-infection (“protective immunity”).

Who should be tested using the COVID-19 antibody test?2020-05-15T18:43:50+00:00

SARS-CoV-2 antibody tests are designed to detect specific antibodies against this virus. A positive IgG antibody test suggests past exposure and may indicate a prior infection which may be resolved or is still resolving, and/or protection against re-infection (“protective immunity”).

The SARS-CoV-2 antibody test has not been validated for purposes of diagnosis of infection or disease (COVID-19) and cannot be used to rule in or rule out infection or COVID-19. Sonora Quest offers the molecular test (test code 907080 for swab samples and 907078 for lower respiratory samples) for diagnosing an active COVID-19 infection.

IgG antibody testing should be performed to assess whether an individual (e.g., healthcare worker, student, general population, etc.) has been exposed to SARS-CoV-2 in the past. If a serology test delivers a positive result for the IgG antibody, that means the individual was previously exposed to SARS-CoV-2 and may indicate a prior infection which may be resolved or is still resolving, and/or protection against re-infection (“protective immunity”).

When should an IgG antibody test be performed?2020-05-15T18:45:40+00:00

It usually takes at least 10 days after symptom onset for IgG to reach detectable levels. Based on a recent study of 173 hospitalized patients in China,1 all patients (100%) developed antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. The median time to have detectable (IgG) antibodies (called seroconversion) was 11 to 14 days.

What type of specimen is used for the SARS-CoV-2 antibody test?2020-05-15T18:47:26+00:00

A serum sample obtained by taking a blood sample.

What is the volume of specimen required?2020-05-15T18:49:16+00:00

The required volume is 1.0 mL (0.5 mL minimum) of serum.

What supplies do I need to perform a SARS-CoV-2 antibody test?2020-05-15T18:53:58+00:00

The supplies needed are serum separator vacutainer tubes (SSTs).

Are there any special storage or transport procedures for these specimens?2020-05-15T18:55:33+00:00

Specimen stability for the antibody test is as follows:

  • Room temperature: 5 days
  • Refrigerated (2 °C–8 °C): 7 days
  • Frozen (-20 °C): 7 days

Specimens should be transported refrigerated to Sonora Quest according to standard operating procedures. Cold packs/pouches must be used if placing specimens in a lockbox for courier pick-up. STAT pick-up cannot be ordered for this test. The COVID-19 antibody test does not need to be ordered on its own separate requisition.

What is the expected turnaround time for patients to receive test results?2020-05-15T18:59:24+00:00

Turnaround time for the antibody test is typically 1-4 days from the time of collection but can vary due to high demand.

What is Sonora Quest’s capacity for the antibody test?2020-05-15T19:03:00+00:00

Sonora Quest initially expects to be able to run 1,000 – 3,000 tests per day and is continuing to scale up testing capacity on the antibody platform.

Which Sonora Quest COVID-19 test should customers be using?2020-05-15T19:06:26+00:00

IgG antibody testing (test code 907097) should be performed to assess whether someone has been exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus in the past. IgG antibody testing should not be used to diagnose active infection, and symptomatic patients should always be diagnosed using a molecular COVID-19 test
(test code 907080 for swab samples and 907078 for lower respiratory samples).

Is there a specific CPT code for the antibody test?2020-05-15T19:08:56+00:00

The CPT code for the testing is 86769. CPT codes are based on the American Medical Association (AMA) guidelines and are for informational purposes only. CPT coding is the sole responsibility of the billing party. Please direct any questions regarding coding to the payer being billed.

Should the SARS-CoV-2 antibody test be used to diagnose a symptomatic patient?2020-05-15T19:10:35+00:00

No. Only the molecular test (test code 907080 for swab samples and 907078 for lower respiratory samples) should be used to test a symptomatic patient for COVID-19. The IgG antibody test will help to identify people who have been exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus and may indicate a prior infection which may be resolved or is still resolving, and/or protection against re-infection (“protective immunity”).

Where can the SARS-CoV-2 serology specimens be collected?2020-05-15T19:14:06+00:00

Blood specimens for SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing can be collected by a hospital or health system or in any healthcare setting where a licensed phlebotomist can draw blood. Sonora Quest will be collecting serology specimens at select Patient Service Centers (PSCs) across Arizona. These locations are posted on SonoraQuest.com/coronavirus and are updated on SonoraQuest.com for appointment scheduling. See the list of Patient Service Centers available for scheduling.

What is the difference between an IgG, IgA or IgM antibody test?2020-05-15T19:17:08+00:00

IgA and IgM are early indicators of viral exposure and can aid in the diagnosis of COVID-19. They can take 3-7 days to form after initial exposure. IgG, by contrast, typically takes 10-14 days to form after initial exposure and may indicate a prior infection which may be resolved or is still resolving, and/or protection against reinfection (“protective immunity”). At this time, Sonora Quest is focusing its efforts on IgG antibody testing only. Our focus on IgG will enable Sonora Quest to provide antibody testing that provides insights into an individual’s prior exposure to COVID-19 and the potential for protective immunity, which ultimately may help identify people who may be able to resume work and other daily activities in society.

Is it true that serology tests for COVID-19 have a high false-positive rate?2020-05-15T19:19:49+00:00

There are many point of care (POC) tests out in the market that have not been validated and/or have no EUA from the FDA. Many of these fingerstick tests show false positives or false negatives. This has resulted in the FDA being more restrictive with those testing options. Any test that Sonora Quest offers will be analytically validated to ensure its quality.

How much does the COVID-19 antibody test cost?2020-05-15T19:21:48+00:00

The price of the test is $65 if billed directly to a healthcare provider’s office, and $99 if billed to insurance or if a patient decides to purchase the test themselves without a doctor’s order or insurance through our My Lab ReQuest™ solution.

Based on the regulations and expected coverage for testing, for our insured patients, Sonora Quest will bill the patient’s insurance directly.  For uninsured patients, Sonora Quest will pursue reimbursement from the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).  Sonora Quest is not billing patients for this testing when ordered by a physician.

I don’t have insurance, but I thought all COVID-19 related testing is supposed to be free. Do I have to pay for COVID-19 testing?2020-05-15T19:26:21+00:00

Based on the regulations and expected coverage for testing, Sonora Quest is not billing patients for this testing when ordered by a physician. It is recommended that patients consult with a physician to determine the medical necessity of obtaining COVID-19 testing. A physician ordered test would likely be covered if the order meets coverage guidelines, resulting in zero out-of-pocket expense.

Note that if you would like to order the COVID-19 antibody test without a doctor’s order or insurance, it is available for $99 through our My Lab ReQuestTM solution.

Orders should be submitted to Sonora Quest with all patient demographics and “Uninsured” noted in the payor portion of the order. Sonora Quest will pursue payment through AHCCCS or Department of Health & Human Services and will not be charging the patient.

I have insurance but I thought all COVID-19 related testing is supposed to be free. Do I have to pay for COVID-19 testing?2020-05-15T19:27:39+00:00

Based on the regulations and expected coverage for testing, for our insured patients, Sonora Quest will bill the patient’s insurance directly.  For uninsured patients, Sonora Quest will pursue reimbursement from the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).  Sonora Quest is not billing patients for this testing when ordered by a physician.

Note that if you would like to order the COVID-19 antibody test without a doctor’s order or insurance, it is available for $99 through our My Lab ReQuestTM solution.

I don’t have insurance, what can I do?2020-05-15T19:30:34+00:00

To apply for AHCCCS or to obtain additional information, patients can visit https://azahcccs.gov/Members/GetCovered/apply.html or call the Applicant & Member Services 1(855)HEA-PLUS (1-855-432-7587). Calls are answered Monday through Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Will the antibody testing need to be on its own requisition, or can it be combined with other tests?2020-05-15T19:32:17+00:00

The antibody testing does not need to be on its own requisition. However, if you’re submitting both a molecular test and an antibody test, the molecular test must be submitted on its own requisition in its own specimen bag.

Can you explain the difference between test sensitivity and test specificity?2020-05-15T19:34:30+00:00

In medical diagnosis, test sensitivity is the ability of a test to correctly identify those with the disease (true positive rate), whereas test specificity is the ability of the test to correctly identify those without the disease (true negative rate).

What is the importance of sensitivity vs specificity in antibody testing for COVID-19?2020-05-15T19:36:15+00:00

Sensitivity is normally used in the context of measuring sensitivity to detect the disease, however, in the context of serology, you are only measuring sensitivity to antibodies, not SARS-CoV-2. Because antibody testing is not used for diagnosis, sensitivity is less important than specificity. The focus is on maximizing specificity for IgG so that we have no false positives. Sonora Quest ensures that test offered for SARS-CoV-2 IgG is extensively validated by the manufacturer to be highly specific. Sonora Quest is also performing our own validation using stringent acceptability criteria for precision, reproducibility, accuracy, method comparison, cross-reactivity, and clinical performance before starting patient testing.

What is the specificity of the EUROIMMUN Anti-SARS-CoV-2 ELISA IgG antibody test?2020-05-15T19:37:52+00:00

As stated in literature provided by EUROIMMUN, analytical specificity of the EUROIMMUN Anti-SARS-CoV-2 ELISA IgG antibody test is 98.5-99%. Due to the low homology of the SARS-CoV-2 S1 protein to the human coronavirus family (HCoV-229E, HCoV-NL63, HCoV-HKU1 or HCoV-OC43), cross-reactions to most of the human pathogenic representatives of this virus family are virtually excluded.

Coronaviruses were first discovered in the 1960s. Is there cross-reactivity between SARS-CoV-2 antibodies with any of these other coronaviruses?2020-05-15T19:39:00+00:00

Sonora Quest is performing a test kit manufactured by EUROIMMUN, a PerkinElmer company. The assay kit package insert6 states that in the validation of the ELISAs, no cross-reactions to antibodies against worldwide-distributed coronaviruses were detected. Cross-reactions with antibodies against the closely related SARS-CoV(-1) and other known human coronaviruses (HKU1, NL63, OC43, or 229E) cannot be completely excluded. However, the specificity of the SARS-CoV-2 IgG immunoassays (ELISA and CMIA) is approximately 99%. Manufacturers6 tested panels of samples from pre-COVID times (2010, 2017, and 2019), with less than 1% samples showing positive results. These findings suggest that antibodies against SARS-CoV and other coronaviruses are not commonly found in the general public.

COVID-19 Testing FAQ

FAQ For COVID-19 Testing

Where can I get tested for COVID-19?2020-04-03T00:55:36+00:00

The process and locations for testing vary from place to place. Contact your state, local, tribal, or territorial department for more information, or reach out to a medical provider. State and local public health departments have received tests from CDC while medical providers are getting tests developed by commercial manufacturers. While supplies of these tests are increasing, it may still be difficult to find someplace to get tested.

What lab will run the coronavirus (COVID-19) test?2020-04-02T21:39:21+00:00

The FDA has approved a large number of commercial labs for Coronavirus (COVID-19) testing. Embry Women’s Health has partnered with BioReference for the testing in our office. This is similar to any other test that might be collected in our office such as a pap smear or STD testing. The swab is collected by our office and then it is sent to BioReference for processing.

Should I be tested for COVID-19?2020-03-31T21:12:14+00:00

Call your healthcare professional if you feel sick with fever, cough, or difficulty breathing, and have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19, or if you live in or have recently traveled from an area with an ongoing spread of COVID-19. You may need to be tested for COVID-19, which is imperative in aiding healthcare professionals and public health authorities to identify infected patients more quickly. BioReference is pleased to offer a high-quality assay to ensure patients and their healthcare providers have greater access to testing to promote earlier diagnosis and help limit the spread of infection.

Please note: A patient cannot order their own tests, and a doctor’s requisition or lab script is required for all testing. Patients under
investigation of COVID-19 and seeking an evaluation of the disease will not be collected at BioReference Patient Service Centers, and
the specimen should be collected at physician offices, hospitals or other clinic settings.

Is the coronavirus (COVID-19) test painful?2020-04-02T21:50:22+00:00

No, the coronavirus (COVID-19) test is not painful. While collecting the sample from the nostril it is common to cause brief discomfort. You may sneeze and or have your eyes water, this is normal and generally an indication that the sample has been collected correctly.

How much is the coronavirus (COVID-19) test without insurance?2020-04-02T21:45:47+00:00

BioReference is currently charging $55 for the coronavirus (COVID-19) test if you do not have insurance. This would be in addition to the office charge from Embry Women’s Health. If you have insurance there is no charge for the lab test. 

The BioReference website provides the following:

Self-Pay Pricing

Along with many of our other clinical tests, COVID-19 is available with a self-pay patient price to increase access to comprehensive testing for patients who do not have health insurance or for those who intentionally choose not to submit a claim to their insurance company. The COVID-19 self-pay price is $55.

 

How much does testing for coronavirus (COVID-19) cost?2020-04-02T21:36:04+00:00

Testing for coronavirus (COVID-19) is extremely low cost or free. If you have a copay that would be due at the appointment. There is no charge for the actual lab test if you have insurance. As all insurance companies are covering the actual COVID-19 lab test fully.

How long does it take for the coronavirus (COVID-19) test results to come back?2020-04-02T21:56:33+00:00

BioReference is processing the coronavirus (COVID-19) tests extremely quickly. Once the lab receives the test swab they typically have it reported the next business day. Collected swabs are sent to BioReference each night. That means they receive the swab the day after it is collected.

If you have a swab collected on Monday it will be sent out Monday night. BioReference will receive the swab Tuesday morning. They will run the test on Tuesday. On Wednesday they will report the result. Once the result is received in our results system we will post it to the patient portal. You will receive a notification once it is available.

Please note this is not a guarantee. It may take 1 to 3 days for them to process the specimen. Which can happen if volume dramatically increased. However, at the time of this writing 04/02/2020 results are being reported as listed above.

Do I need to get my pet tested for COVID-19?2020-04-03T01:37:34+00:00

No. At this time, routine testing of animals for COVID-19 is not recommended.

Can a person test negative and later test positive for COVID-19?2020-04-03T00:58:35+00:00

Using the CDC-developed diagnostic test, a negative result means that the virus that causes COVID-19 was not found in the person’s sample. In the early stages of infection, it is possible the virus will not be detected.

For COVID-19, a negative test result for a sample collected while a person has symptoms likely means that the COVID-19 virus is not causing their current illness.

COVID-19 Myth Busters

Am I at risk for COVID-19 from a package or products shipping from China?2020-04-01T23:32:12+00:00

There is still a lot that is unknown about the newly emerged COVID-19 and how it spreads. Two other coronaviruses have emerged previously to cause severe illness in people (MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV). The virus that causes COVID-19 is more genetically related to SARS-CoV than MERS-CoV, but both are betacoronaviruses with their origins in bats. While we don’t know for sure that this virus will behave the same way as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, we can use the information gained from both of these earlier coronaviruses to guide us. In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely a very low risk of spread from products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient temperatures. Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread most often by respiratory droplets. Currently, there is no evidence to support the transmission of COVID-19 associated with imported goods and there have not been any cases of COVID-19 in the United States associated with imported goods. Information will be provided on the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) website as it becomes available.

Can the virus that cause COVID-19 be spread through food, including refrigerated or frozen food?2020-04-01T22:37:34+00:00

Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person-to-person through respiratory droplets. Currently, there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food. Before preparing or eating food it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from food products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient, refrigerated, or frozen temperatures.

Are antibiotics effective in preventing and treating the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:38:38+00:00

No, antibiotics do not work against viruses, only bacteria.
The new coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is a virus and, therefore, antibiotics should not be used as a means of prevention or treatment.
However, if you are hospitalized for the 2019-nCoV, you may receive antibiotics since bacterial co-infection is possible.

no antibiotics

Can cold weather and snow kill the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:35:38+00:00

There is no reason to believe that cold weather can kill the new coronavirus or other diseases.
The normal human body temperature remains around 36.5°C and 37°C, regardless of the external temperature or weather.
The most effective way to protect yourself against the new coronavirus is by frequently cleaning your hands with alcohol-based hand rub or washing them with soap and water.

cold weather

Can a hot bath prevent the new coronavirus disease?2020-04-03T12:34:31+00:00

Taking a hot bath will not prevent you from catching COVID-19. Your normal body temperature remains around 36.5°C to 37°C, regardless of the temperature of your bath or shower. Actually, taking a hot bath with extremely hot water can be harmful, as it can burn you.
The best way to protect yourself against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this, you eliminate viruses that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes, mouth, and nose.

hot bath

Can the new coronavirus be transmitted through mosquito bites?2020-04-03T12:33:12+00:00

To date, there has been no information nor evidence to suggest that the new coronavirus could be transmitted by mosquitoes.
The new coronavirus is a respiratory virus which spreads primarily through droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes, or through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose.
To protect yourself, clean your hands frequently with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Also, avoid close contact with anyone who is coughing and sneezing.

mosquito bites

Are hand dryers effective in killing the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:30:24+00:00

No. Hand dryers are not effective in killing the 2019-nCoV.
To protect yourself against the new coronavirus, you should frequently clean your hands with an alcohol-based rub or wash them with soap and water. Once your hands are cleaned, you should dry them thoroughly by using paper towels or a warm air dryer.

hand dryer

Can an ultraviolet disinfection lamp kill the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:28:52+00:00

UV lamps should not be used to sterilize hands or other areas of skin as UV radiation can cause skin irritation.

uv lamps

How effective are thermal scanners in detecting people that are infected with the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:27:26+00:00

Thermal scanners are effective in detecting people who have developed a fever (i.e. have a higher than normal body temperature) because of infection with the new coronavirus.
However, they cannot detect people who are infected but are not yet sick with a fever. This is because it takes 2 and 10 days before people who are infected become sick and develop a fever.

thermal scanner

Can spraying alcohol or chlorine all over your body kill the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:26:00+00:00

No. Spraying alcohol or chlorine all over your body will not kill viruses that have already entered your body. Spraying such substances can be harmful to your clothes or mucous membranes (i.e. eyes, mouth). Be aware that both alcohol and chlorine can be useful to disinfect surfaces, but they need to be used under appropriate recommendations.

alcohol chlorine

Do vaccines against pneumonia protect you against the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:24:19+00:00

No. Vaccines against pneumonia, such as pneumococcal vaccine and Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib) vaccine, do not provide protection against the new coronavirus.
The virus is so new and different that it needs its own vaccine. Researchers are trying to develop a vaccine against 2019-nCoV, and WHO is supporting their efforts.
Although these vaccines are not effective against 2019-nCoV, vaccination against respiratory illnesses is highly recommended to protect your health.

vaccines protect

Can regularly rinsing your nose with saline help prevent infection with the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:22:40+00:00

No. There is no evidence that regularly rinsing the nose with saline has protected people from infection with the new coronavirus.
There is some limited evidence that regularly rinsing the nose with saline can help people recover more quickly from the common cold. However, regularly rinsing the nose has not been shown to prevent respiratory infections.

rinsing saline

Can eating garlic help prevent infection with the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:20:39+00:00

Garlic is a healthy food that may have some antimicrobial properties. However, there is no evidence from the current outbreak that eating garlic has protected people from the new coronavirus (2019-nCoV).

eating garlic

Does the new coronavirus affect older people alone, or are the younger ones also susceptible?2020-04-03T12:18:59+00:00

People of all ages can be affected by the new coronavirus (nCoV-2019).
Older people and people with pre-existing medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease) appear to be more vulnerable to becoming severely ill with the virus.
WHO advises people of all ages to take steps to protect themselves from the virus, for example by following good hand hygiene and good respiratory hygiene.

all ages

Can COVID-19 spread through faeces?2020-04-03T02:43:45+00:00

Like other coronaviruses, this virus can be found in faeces. But COVID-19 spreads primarily through close contact with an infected person or the droplets released when they sneeze or cough. To protect yourself, wash your hands regularly – especially before preparing food or eating, after coughing or sneezing, before and after using the toilet and after changing a child’s diaper.

spread faeces

Drinking water alleviates a sore throat. Does this also protect against COVID-19?2020-04-03T02:35:24+00:00

While staying hydrated by drinking water is important for overall health, it does not prevent coronavirus infection. If you have a fever, cough, and difficulty breathing, seek medical care early and share previous travel history with your health care provider. If possible, call ahead so your health care provider can prepare for your visit.

drinking water

Can the new coronavirus (COVID-19) survive in hot and humid climates?2020-04-03T02:32:08+00:00

Yes, 2019-nCoV has spread to countries with both hot and humid climates, as well as cold and dry. Wherever you live, whatever the climate, it is important to follow precautions. Wash your hands frequently and cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue or a bent elbow. Throw the tissue in the bin and wash your hands immediately afterwards.

hot and humid

Does drinking alcohol prevent the new coronavirus (COVID-19)?2020-04-03T02:26:23+00:00

No, drinking does not protect you from 2019-nCov infection. Reduce your risk of coronavirus infection by frequently cleaning hands using alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water; when coughing and sneezing, cover mouth and nose with flexed elbow or tissue – throw away immediately and wash hands; and avoid close contact with anyone who has fever and cough.

Drinking alcohol

FACT: COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in areas with hot and humid climates2020-03-31T15:16:50+00:00

From the evidence so far, the COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in ALL AREAS, including areas with hot and humid weather. Regardless of climate, adopt protective measures if you live in, or travel to an area reporting COVID-19. The best way to protect yourself against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this you eliminate viruses that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes, mouth, and nose.

COVID-19 Prevention

While school’s out, can my child hang out with their friends?2020-04-03T01:52:27+00:00

• The key to slowing the spread of COVID-19 is to practice social distancing. While school is out, children should not have in-person playdates with children from other households. If children are playing outside their own homes, it is essential that they remain 6 feet from anyone who is not in their own household.
• To help children maintain social connections while social distancing, help your children have supervised phone calls or video chats with their friends.
• Make sure children practice everyday preventive behaviors, such as washing their hands often with soap and water. Remember, if children meet outside of school in groups, it can put everyone at risk.
∙Revise spring break plans if they included non-essential travel.
• Information about COVID-19 in children is somewhat limited, but current data suggest children with COVID-19 may only have mild symptoms. However, they can still pass this virus onto others who may be at higher risk, including older adults and people who have serious underlying medical conditions.

What precautions should be taken for animals that have recently been imported from outside the United States (for example, by shelters, rescues, or as personal pets)?2020-04-03T01:48:55+00:00

Imported animals will need to meet CDC and USDA requirements for entering the United States. At this time, there is no evidence that companion animals, including pets and service animals, can spread COVID-19. As with any animal introduced to a new environment, animals recently imported should be observed daily for signs of illness. If an animal becomes ill, the animal should be examined by a veterinarian. Call your local veterinary clinic before bringing the animal into the clinic and let them know that the animal was recently imported from another country.

This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.

Should I avoid contact with pets or other animals if I am sick with COVID-19?2020-04-03T01:42:54+00:00

You should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would around other people. Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the new coronavirus. When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick. If you are sick with COVID-19, avoid contact with your pet, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with pets.

Can animals carry the virus that causes COVID-19 on their skin or fur?2020-04-03T01:39:56+00:00

At this time, there is no evidence that the virus that causes COVID-19 can spread to people from the skin or fur of pets.

Talk to your veterinarian about the best ways to care for your pet.

Can I get COVID-19 from my pets or other animals?2020-04-03T01:34:12+00:00

There is no reason at this time to think that any animals, including pets, in the United States might be a source of infection with this new coronavirus that causes COVID-19. To date, CDC has not received any reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19 in the United States.

Pets have other types of coronaviruses that can make them sick, like canine and feline coronaviruses. These other coronaviruses cannot infect people and are not related to the current COVID-19 outbreak.

However, since animals can spread other diseases to people, it’s always a good idea to practice healthy habits around pets and other animals, such as washing your hands and maintaining good hygiene.

Am I at risk if I touch someone who died of COVID-19 after they passed away?2020-04-03T01:29:31+00:00

COVID-19 is a new disease and we are still learning how it spreads. The virus that causes COVID-19 is thought to mainly spread from close contact (i.e., within about 6 feet) with a person who is currently sick with COVID-19. The virus likely spreads primarily through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes, similar to how influenza and other respiratory infections spread. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. This type of spread is not a concern after a death.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

People should consider not touching the body of someone who has died of COVID-19. Older people and people of all ages with severe underlying health conditions are at higher risk of developing serious COVID-19 illness. There may be less of a chance of the virus spreading from certain types of touching, such as holding the hand or hugging after the body has been prepared for viewing. Other activities, such as kissing, washing, and shrouding should be avoided before, during, and after the body has been prepared, if possible. If washing the body or shrouding are important religious or cultural practices, families are encouraged to work with their community cultural and religious leaders and funeral home staff on how to reduce their exposure as much as possible. At a minimum, people conducting these activities should wear disposable gloves. If splashing of fluids is expected, additional personal protective equipment (PPE) may be required (such as disposable gown, face shield or goggles, and facemask).

Cleaning should be conducted in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products (e.g., concentration, application method and contact time, etc.). Products with EPA-approved emerging viral pathogens claims are expected to be effective against COVID-19 based on data for harder to kill viruses. After removal of PPE, perform hand hygiene by washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available. Soap and water should be used if the hands are visibly soiled.

Am I at risk if I go to a funeral or visitation service for someone who died of COVID-19?2020-04-03T01:26:30+00:00

There is currently no known risk associated with being in the same room at a funeral or visitation service with the body of someone who died of COVID-19.

Are people with disabilities at higher risk?2020-04-03T01:23:01+00:00

Most people with disabilities are not inherently at higher risk of becoming infected with or having severe illness from COVID-19. Some people with physical limitations or other disabilities might be at a higher risk of infection because of their underlying medical condition.

People with certain disabilities might experience higher rates of chronic health conditions that put them at higher risk of serious illness and poorer outcomes from COVID-19.
• Adults with disabilities are three times more likely to have heart disease, stroke, diabetes, or cancer than adults without disabilities.

You should talk with your healthcare provider if you have a question about your health or how your health condition is being managed.

What about underlying medical conditions that are not included on this list?2020-04-03T01:21:04+00:00

Based on available information, adults aged 65 years and older and people of any age with underlying medical conditions included on this list are at higher risk for severe illness and poorer outcomes from COVID-19. CDC is collecting and analyzing data regularly and will update the list when we learn more. People with underlying medical conditions not on the list might also be at higher risk and should consult with their healthcare provider if they are concerned.

We encourage all people, regardless of risk, to:
• Take steps to protect yourself and others.
• Call your healthcare provider if you are sick with a fever, cough, or shortness of breath.
• Follow CDC travel guidelines and the recommendations of your state and local health officials.

How were the underlying conditions selected?2020-04-03T01:18:06+00:00

This list is based on:
• What we are learning from the outbreak in other countries and in the United States.
• What we know about risk from other respiratory infections, like flu.
As CDC gets more information about COVID-19 cases here in the US, we will update this list as needed.

Will businesses and schools close or stay closed in my community and for how long? Will there be a “stay at home” or “shelter in place” order in my community?2020-04-03T00:42:46+00:00

CDC makes recommendations, shares information, and provides guidance to help slow down the spread of COVID-19 in the U.S. including guidance for schools and businesses. CDC regularly shares information and provides assistance to state, local, territorial, and tribal health authorities. These local authorities are responsible for making decisions including “stay at home” or “shelter in place.” What is included in these orders and how they are implemented are also decided by local authorities. These decisions may also depend on many factors such as how the virus is spreading in a certain community.

Should I go to work if there is an outbreak in my community?2020-04-03T00:39:23+00:00

Follow the advice of your local health officials. Stay home if you can. Talk to your employer to discuss working from home, taking leave if you or someone in your household gets sick with COVID-19 symptoms, or if your child’s school is dismissed temporarily. Employers should be aware that more employees may need to stay at home to care for sick children or other sick family members than is usual in case of a community outbreak.

Will schools be dismissed if there is an outbreak in my community?2020-04-03T00:37:04+00:00

Depending on the situation, public health officials may recommend community actions to reduce exposures to COVID-19, such as school dismissals. Read or watch local media sources that report school dismissals or and watch for communication from your child’s school. If schools are dismissed temporarily, discourage students and staff from gathering or socializing anywhere, like at a friend’s house, a favorite restaurant, or the local shopping mall.

What steps should parents take to protect children during a community outbreak?2020-04-03T00:34:27+00:00

This is a new virus and we are still learning about it, but so far, there does not seem to be a lot of illness in children. Most illness, including serious illness, is happening in adults of working age and older adults. If there are cases of COVID-19 that impact your child’s school, the school may dismiss students. Keep track of school dismissals in your community. Read or watch local media sources that report school dismissals. If schools are dismissed temporarily, use alternative childcare arrangements, if needed.

If your child/children become sick with COVID-19, notify their childcare facility or school. Talk with teachers about classroom assignments and activities they can do from home to keep up with their schoolwork.

Discourage children and teens from gathering in other public places while school is dismissed to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in the community.

How do I prepare my children in case of COVID-19 outbreak in my community?2020-04-03T00:31:23+00:00

Outbreaks can be stressful for adults and children. Talk with your children about the outbreak, try to stay calm, and reassure them that they are safe. If appropriate, explain to them that most illness from COVID-19 seems to be mild. Children respond differently to stressful situations than adults.

What should I do if there’s an outbreak in my community?2020-04-03T00:29:43+00:00

During an outbreak, stay calm and put your preparedness plan to work. Follow the steps below:

Protect yourself and others.
• Stay home if you are sick. Keep away from people who are sick. Limit close contact with others as much as possible (about 6 feet).

Put your household plan into action.
• Stay informed about the local COVID-19 situation. Be aware of temporary school dismissals in your area, as this may affect your household’s daily routine.
• Continue practicing everyday preventive actions. Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue and wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer that contains 60% alcohol. Clean frequently touched surfaces and objects daily using a regular household detergent and water.
• Notify your workplace as soon as possible if your regular work schedule changes. Ask to work from home or take leave if you or someone in your household gets sick with COVID-19 symptoms, or if your child’s school is dismissed temporarily. Learn how businesses and employers can plan for and respond to COVID-19.
• Stay in touch with others by phone or email. If you have a chronic medical condition and live alone, ask family, friends, and health care providers to check on you during an outbreak. Stay in touch with family and friends, especially those at increased risk of developing severe illness, such as older adults and people with severe chronic medical conditions.

Should I make my own hand sanitizer if I can’t find it in the stores?2020-04-03T00:25:22+00:00

CDC recommends handwashing with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or, using alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol when soap and water are not available. These actions are part of everyday preventive actions individuals can take to slow the spread of respiratory diseases like COVID-19.

• When washing hands, you can use plain soap or antibacterial soap. Plain soap is as effective as antibacterial soap at removing germs.
• If soap and water are not readily available, you can use an FDA-approved alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. You can tell if the sanitizer contains at least 60% alcohol by looking at the product label.

CDC does not encourage the production and use of homemade hand sanitizer products because of concerns over the correct use of the ingredients and the need to work under sterile conditions to make the product. Organizations should revert to the use of commercially produced, FDA-approved product once such supplies again become available.

• To be effective against killing some types of germs, hand sanitizers need to have a strength of at least 60% alcohol and be used when hands are not visibly dirty or greasy.
• Do not rely on “Do It Yourself” or “DIY” recipes based solely on essential oils or formulated without correct compounding practices.
• Do not use hand sanitizer to disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects.

What cleaning products should I use to protect against COVID-19?2020-04-03T00:17:35+00:00

Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces such as tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks. If surfaces are dirty, clean them using detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection. To disinfect, most common EPA-registered household disinfectants will work.

Should I use soap and water or a hand sanitizer to protect against COVID-19?2020-04-03T00:15:15+00:00

Handwashing is one of the best ways to protect yourself and your family from getting sick. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

How can I prepare for COVID-19 at work?2020-04-03T00:13:44+00:00

Plan for potential changes at your workplace. Talk to your employer about their emergency operations plan, including sick-leave policies and telework options.

How can I prepare in case my child’s school, child care facility, or university is dismissed?2020-04-03T00:12:19+00:00

Talk to the school or facility about their emergency operations plan. Understand the plan for continuing education and social services (such as student meal programs) during school dismissals. If your child attends a college or university, encourage them to learn about the school’s plan for a COVID-19 outbreak.

What should I do if someone in my house gets sick with COVID-19?2020-04-02T22:06:11+00:00

Most people who get COVID-19 will be able to recover at home. CDC has directions for people who are recovering at home and their caregivers, including:

• Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
• Use a separate room and bathroom for sick household members (if possible).
• Clean hands regularly by handwashing with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
• Provide your sick household member with clean disposable facemasks to wear at home, if available, to help prevent spreading COVID-19 to others.
• Clean the sick room and bathroom, as needed, to avoid unnecessary contact with the sick person.
• Avoid sharing personal items like utensils, food, and drinks.

What steps can my family take to reduce our risk of getting COVID-19?2020-04-02T21:38:03+00:00

Practice everyday preventive actions to help reduce your risk of getting sick and remind everyone in your home to do the same. These actions are especially important for older adults and people who have severe chronic medical conditions:

• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
• Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
• Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue and throw the tissue in the trash.
• Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
• If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
• Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects
(e.g., tables, countertops, light switches, doorknobs, and cabinet handles).

How can my family and I prepare for COVID-19?2020-04-02T19:49:06+00:00

Create a household plan of action to help protect your health and the health of those you care about in the event of an outbreak of COVID-19 in your community:

• Talk with the people who need to be included in your plan, and discuss what to do if a COVID-19 outbreak occurs in your community.
• Plan ways to care for those who might be at greater risk for serious complications, particularly older adults and those with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease.
  ∙ Make sure they have access to several weeks of medications and supplies in case you need to stay home for prolonged periods of time.
• Get to know your neighbors and find out if your neighborhood has a website or social media page to stay connected.
• Create a list of local organizations that you and your household can contact in the event you need access to information, healthcare services, support, and resources.
• Create an emergency contact list of family, friends, neighbors, carpool drivers, health care providers, teachers, employers, the local public health department, and other community resources.

Should children wear masks?2020-04-02T19:44:27+00:00

No. If your child is healthy, there is no need for them to wear a facemask. Only people who have symptoms of illness or who are providing care to those who are ill should wear masks.

Are the symptoms of COVID-19 different in children than in adults?2020-04-02T19:41:08+00:00

No. The symptoms of COVID-19 are similar in children and adults. However, children with confirmed COVID-19 have generally presented with mild symptoms. Reported symptoms in children include cold-like symptoms, such as fever, runny nose, and cough. Vomiting and diarrhea have also been reported. It’s not known yet whether some children may be at higher risk for severe illness, for example, children with underlying medical conditions and special healthcare needs. There is much more to be learned about how the disease impacts children.

How can I protect my child from COVID-19 infection?2020-04-02T19:19:04+00:00

You can encourage your child to help stop the spread of COVID-19 by teaching them to do the same things everyone should do to stay healthy.

• Clean hands often using soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer
• Avoid people who are sick (coughing and sneezing)
• Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces daily in household common areas (e.g. tables, hard-backed chairs, doorknobs, light switches, remotes, handles, desks, toilets, sinks)
• Launder items including washable plush toys as appropriate in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. If possible, launder items using the warmest appropriate water setting for the items and dry items completely. Dirty laundry from an ill person can be washed with other people’s items.

What is the risk of my child becoming sick with COVID-19?2020-04-02T18:53:45+00:00

Based on available evidence, children do not appear to be at higher risk for COVID-19 than adults. While some children and infants have been sick with COVID-19, adults make up most of the known cases to date.

Is it okay for me to donate blood despite the COVID-19 pandemic?2020-04-01T23:39:48+00:00

In healthcare settings all across the United States, donated blood is a lifesaving, essential part of caring for patients. The need for donated blood is constant, and blood centers are open and in urgent need of donations. CDC encourages people who are well to continue to donate blood if they are able, even if they are practicing social distancing because of COVID-19. CDC is supporting blood centers by providing recommendations that will keep donors and staff safe. Examples of these recommendations include spacing donor chairs 6 feet apart, thoroughly adhering to environmental cleaning practices, and encouraging donors to make donation appointments ahead of time.

Does CDC recommend the use of facemask to prevent COVID-19?2020-04-01T23:26:56+00:00

CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19. You should only wear a mask if a healthcare professional recommends it. A facemask should be used by people who have COVID-19 and are showing symptoms. This is to protect others from the risk of getting infected. The use of facemasks also is crucial for health workers and other people who are taking care of someone infected with COVID-19 in close settings (at home or in a health care facility).

What should people at higher risk of serious illness with COVID-19 do?2020-04-01T23:22:33+00:00

If you are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should: stock up on supplies; take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others; when you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick; limit close contact and wash your hands often; and avoid crowds, cruise travel, and non-essential travel. If there is an outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible. Watch for symptoms and emergency signs. If you get sick, stay home and call your doctor.

Who is at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19?2020-04-03T01:14:35+00:00

COVID-19 is a new disease and there is limited information regarding risk factors for severe disease. Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Based upon available information to date, those at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19 include:

• People aged 65 years and older
• People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility
• Other high-risk conditions could include:
∙People with chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma
∙People who have heart disease with complications
∙People who are immunocompromised including cancer treatment
∙People of any age with severe obesity (body mass index [(BM]I)≥40) or certain underlying medical conditions, particularly if not well controlled, such as those with diabetes, renal failure, or liver disease might also be at risk
• People who are pregnant should be monitored since they are known to be at risk with a severe viral illness, however, to date data on COVID-19 has not shown an increased risk

What temperature kills the virus that causes COVID-19?2020-04-01T22:51:33+00:00

Generally, coronaviruses survive for shorter periods of time at higher temperatures and higher humidity than in cooler or dryer environments. However, we don’t have direct data for this virus, nor do we have direct data for a temperature-based cutoff for inactivation at this point. The necessary temperature would also be based on the materials of the surface, the environment, etc. Regardless of temperature please follow CDC’s guidance for cleaning and disinfection.

What is community spread?2020-04-01T22:46:05+00:00

Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

Can someone who has been quarantined for COVID-19 spread the illness to others?2020-04-01T22:31:43+00:00

Quarantine means separating a person or group of people who have been exposed to a contagious disease but have not developed illness (symptoms) from others who have not been exposed, in order to prevent the possible spread of that disease. Quarantine is usually established for the incubation period of the communicable disease, which is the span of time during which people have developed the illness after exposure. For COVID-19, the period of quarantine is 14 days from the last date of exposure, because 14 days is the longest incubation period seen for similar coronaviruses. Someone who has been released from COVID-19 quarantine is not considered a risk for spreading the virus to others because they have not developed illness during the incubation period.

Can someone who has had COVID-19 spread the illness to others?2020-04-01T22:25:53+00:00

The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading from person-to-person. Someone who is actively sick with COVID-19 can spread the illness to others. That is why CDC recommends that these patients be isolated either in the hospital or at home (depending on how sick they are) until they are better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others.

How long someone is actively sick can vary so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made on a case-by-case basis in consultation with doctors, infection prevention and control experts, and public health officials and involves considering specifics of each situation including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and results of laboratory testing for that patient.

Current CDC guidance for when it is OK to release someone from isolation is made on a case by case basis and includes meeting all of the following requirements:

* The patient is free from fever without the use of fever-reducing medications.
* The patient is no longer showing symptoms, including cough.
* The patient has tested negative on at least two consecutive respiratory specimens collected at least 24 hours apart.

Someone who has been released from isolation is not considered to pose a risk of infection to others.

Why are we seeing a rise in COVID-19 cases?2020-04-01T22:21:25+00:00

The number of cases of COVID-19 being reported in the United States is rising due to increased laboratory testing and reporting across the country. The growing number of cases in part reflects the rapid spread of COVID-19 as many U.S. states and territories experience community spread. More detailed and accurate data will allow us to better understand and track the size and scope of the outbreak and strengthen prevention and response efforts.

How can people help stop stigma related to COVID-19?2020-04-01T22:18:56+00:00

People can fight stigma and help, not hurt, others by providing social support. Counter stigma by learning and sharing facts. Communicating the facts that viruses do not target specific racial or ethnic groups and how COVID-19 actually spreads can help stop the stigma.

Why might someone blame or avoid individuals and groups (create stigma) because of COVID-19?2020-04-01T22:14:27+00:00

People in the U.S. may be worried or anxious about friends and relatives who are living in or visiting areas where COVID-19 is spreading. Some people are worried about the disease. Fear and anxiety can lead to social stigma, for example, towards Chinese or other Asian Americans or people who were in quarantine.

Stigma is discrimination against an identifiable group of people, a place, or a nation. Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how COVID-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths.

Stigma hurts everyone by creating more fear or anger towards ordinary people instead of the disease that is causing the problem.

Can a face mask protect me from coronavirus?2020-04-01T00:22:09+00:00

Wearing a face mask is certainly not an iron-clad guarantee that you won’t get sick – viruses can also transmit through the eyes and tiny viral particles, known as aerosols, can penetrate masks. However, masks are effective at capturing droplets, which is a main transmission route of coronavirus, and some studies have estimated a roughly fivefold protection versus no barrier alone (although others have found lower levels of effectiveness).

If you are likely to be in close contact with someone infected, a mask cuts the chance of the disease being passed on. If you’re showing symptoms of coronavirus, or have been diagnosed, wearing a mask can also protect others. So masks are crucial for the health and social care workers looking after patients and are also recommended for family members who need to care for someone who is ill – ideally, both the patient and carer should have a mask.

Are there any specific medicines to prevent or treat the new coronavirus?2020-04-03T12:37:12+00:00

To date, there is no specific medicine recommended to prevent or treat the new coronavirus (2019-nCoV).
However, those infected with the virus should receive appropriate care to relieve and treat symptoms, and those with severe illness should receive optimized supportive care.
Some specific treatments are under investigation and will be tested through clinical trials.
WHO is helping to accelerate research and development efforts with a range of partners.

specific medicine

What type of disinfectant can I use to wipe down surfaces to protect against COVID-19?2020-04-03T02:39:19+00:00

If a surface is dirty, first wipe it down with regular household soap or detergent and rinse with water. Then, use a regular household disinfectant like bleach – its active ingredient (sodium hypochlorite) kills bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Always protect your hands when using bleach (e.g. wear rubber gloves). Dilute bleach with water according to directions on the package.

type of disinfectant

How do I ensure clothes and bedlinen don’t spread novel coronavirus?2020-04-03T02:48:00+00:00

Don’t carry dirty linen or clothes against your body. Wash them in hot water (between 60-90°) with laundry detergent soap. If available, add bleach. Follow the directions on the package. Machine dry on a high temperature or dry in direct sunlight.

clothes bedlinen

What is the CDC doing about COVID-19?2020-03-31T21:14:26+00:00

This is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation and CDC will continue to provide updated information as it becomes available. CDC works 24/7 to protect people’s health. More information about CDC’s response to COVID-19 is available online.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?2020-03-31T20:52:35+00:00

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure and include:
• Fever
• Cough
• Shortness of breath

How can I protect myself from contracting COVID-19?2020-03-31T20:47:36+00:00

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being
exposed to this virus. The CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
• Stay home when you are sick.
• Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then immediately throw the tissue in the trash.
• Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
• CDC does not recommend that people who are well to wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including COVID-19. Facemasks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to others. The use of facemasks is also crucial for health workers and people who are taking care of someone in close settings (at home or in a health care facility).
• Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom, before eating, and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
• If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.

Am I at risk for contracting the COVID-19 virus in the United States?2020-03-31T20:44:36+00:00

This is a rapidly evolving situation and the risk assessment may change daily. The latest updates are available on CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) website.

Can an infected person spread the virus?2020-03-31T20:42:53+00:00

Yes, someone who is actively sick with COVID-19 can spread the illness to others. The CDC recommends that these patients be isolated either in the hospital or at home (depending on how sick they are) until they are better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others.

How long someone is actively sick can vary so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made on a case by case basis in consultation with healthcare providers, infection prevention and control experts, and public health officials and involves considering specifics of each situation including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and results of laboratory testing for that patient.

Current CDC guidance for when it is OK to release someone from isolation is made on a case by case basis and includes meeting all of the following requirements:
• The patient is free from fever without the use of fever-reducing medications.
• The patient is no longer showing symptoms, including cough.
• The patient has tested negative on at least two consecutive respiratory specimens collected at least 24 hours apart.

How does the virus spread?2020-03-31T20:34:03+00:00

This coronavirus was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. The first infections were linked to a live animal market, but the virus is now spreading from person to person. It’s important to note that person to person spread can happen on a continuum. Some viruses are highly contagious (like measles), while other viruses are less so.
The virus that causes COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in some affected geographic areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

What is the source of the virus?2020-03-31T20:26:35+00:00

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Rarely, animal coronaviruses that infect animals have emerged to infect people and can spread between people. This is suspected to have occurred for the virus that causes COVID-19. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are two other examples of coronaviruses that originated from animals and then spread to people.

What is the name of the virus causing the outbreak of coronavirus disease?2020-03-31T20:15:57+00:00

On February 11, 2020, the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, charged with naming new viruses, named the novel
coronavirus, first identified in Wuhan, China, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, shortened to SARS-CoV-2. The virus
is related to the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that caused an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in
2002-2003; however it is not the same virus.

What is the coronavirus?2020-03-31T20:09:45+00:00

The coronavirus is a (novel) new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019
(COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly occur among humans and cause mild illness. A diagnosis with
coronavirus 229E, NL63, OC43, or HKU1 is not the same as a COVID-19 diagnosis. Patients with COVID-19 will be evaluated and
cared for differently than patients with common coronavirus diagnosis.

How can I protect myself from contracting COVID-19?2020-03-31T15:56:15+00:00

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. The CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then immediately throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including
    COVID-19. Facemasks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to
    others. The use of facemasks is also crucial for health workers and people who are taking care of someone in close settings
    (at home or in a health care facility).
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom, before eating, and
    after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with
    soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.

Other Resources

US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

World Health Organization (WHO)
www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novelcoronavirus-2019

Embry Women’s Health Appointment Visitor Policy Related to COVID-19

DO NOT SCHEDULE A NORMAL OFFICE VISIT FOR COVID-19 TESTING 

For the safety of our employees and patients COVID-19 testing is processed outside of normal clinic operations. We have a dedicated patient care coordinator who is responsible for COVID-19. She will ensure that you are scheduled correctly and have all of the information needed. Please sign up for testing using the web form on this page. If you have any questions at all please call or text our office. 480-376-2170.

Do not schedule an office visit through the website or patient portal for COVID-19 testing.

SIGN-UP FOR TESTING

CAN I BE TESTED FOR COVID-19? YES

Call 911 if you have a medical emergency: If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, notify the operator that you have or think you might have, COVID-19. If possible, put on a facemask before medical help arrives.

Resources For Healthcare Professionals

COVID-19 Provider Resources

Resources for providers related to COVID-19 testing, specimens, labs and insurance.
Provider Resources

COVID-19 Test Kit Resources

Resources for collecting COVID-19 specimens including swabs, vials and transport medium.
Test Kit Resources