BRACAnalysis Patient Brochure

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do you have a family history of Breast or Ovarian Cancer?

Ask yourself the question. The answer could help you be ready against hereditary cancer.
What is a family history of breast or ovarian cancer?
To understand if breast or ovarian cancer runs in your family, look at your whole family history, including your father’s side. Breast or ovarian cancer risk isn’t just passed from mother to daughter or son. A father can also pass it on to his daughter or son.
You could have an inherited risk if*:

  • You or a family member (mother’s or father’s side) were diagnosed with breast cancer at age 50 or younger
  • You or a family member were diagnosed with ovarian cancer at any age
  • You have a male family member with breast cancer at any age
  • You have Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, and a personal or family history of an HBOCassociated† cancer at any age
  • There are two breast cancers in the same person or on the same side of the family
  • You or a family member were diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer at any age
  • There is pancreatic cancer and an HBOCassociated† cancer on the same side of the family
  • You have a previously identified BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation in your family

Most hereditary breast and ovarian cancer occurs because of a mutation in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.
If you have a BRCA gene mutation, you could have up to an 87% risk of breast cancer and up to a 44% risk of ovarian cancer in your lifetime.
Understanding if breast or ovarian cancer runs in your family is important. Research shows that early detection—along with taking certain steps—can reduce your risk of developing hereditary cancer.

*Assessment criteria based on medical society guidelines. For these individual medical society guidelines go to www.myriadtests.com/patient_guidelines. †HBOC-associated cancers include breast, ovarian, and pancreatic cancer

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what does it mean to have a family history of breast or ovarian cancer?

Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome is an inherited condition that causes an increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer.
Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes account for the vast majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Knowing if you have a BRCA gene mutation can help you to know your risk of hereditary cancer and inform your family of their potential risk of hereditary cancer.
Important facts and figures about BRCA mutations.
Women with a BRCA mutation have:

  • Up to a 50% risk of developing breast cancer by age 50
  •  Up to an 87% risk of developing breast cancer by age 70
  • Up to a 64% risk of developing a second breast cancer
  • Up to a 44% chance of developing ovarian cancer by age 70
  • Certain BRCA mutations are more common among people of Ashkenazi Jewish descent
  • BRCA mutations also increase the risk for other cancers in both men and women, including up to an 8% risk for male breast cancer and up to a 7% risk for pancreatic cancer in men and women

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the first step to knowing your Risk is Understanding your family history.

Complete as much of the chart below as possible. Your answers can help determine if hereditary breast and ovarian cancer runs in your family. Then discuss it with your doctor or another healthcare provider, and alert him or her if you have marked one or more of the boxes below
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BRACAnalysis ® TestING for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer.

BRACAnalysis is for individuals at risk for hereditary breast or ovarian cancer.
It is not like a mammogram or other screening tests that are recommended for every woman. If you and your health care professional determine that you may be at risk for hereditary breast or ovarian cancer, BRACAnalysis is right for you.
What is BRACAnalysis testing?
BRACAnalysis does not tell you whether you have cancer, but detects mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. These are the gene mutations that are responsible for the vast majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Only a small blood or oral rinse sample is taken for analysis.
How you can use BRACAnalysis test results. The BRACAnalysis test results may enable you and your family to make more informed choices and help you to be ready against hereditary cancer. For example:

  • A woman who discovers she has a BRCA mutation can start screening for breast or ovarian cancer when she is younger or choose to reduce her risk of cancer through medication or surgery
  • A woman already diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer can take certain steps to help prevent a second cancer
  • Individuals with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer may want to know whether they carry a mutation that could be passed down to their children
  • Knowing your test results can also help your doctor or other providers manage your health care needs more effectively.

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Knowing your risk empowers you to lower it.

BRACAnalysis® testing can help you find out your hereditary breast and ovarian cancer risk, so you can manage it before cancer develops. Professional medical organizations recommend the following options:*
Increased Surveillance
Breasts

  • Breast self-exam training and education starting at age 18
  • Clinical breast exams two times a year starting at age 25
  • Yearly screening with mammograms and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) starting at age 25 or individualized based on earliest age of onset in family

Ovaries

  • Transvaginal ultrasound and testing for CA-125 levels in the blood every 6 months starting at age 35 or 5-10 years earlier than the earliest age of first diagnosis of ovarian cancer in the family

Preventive Drug Therapy

  • Drugs such as tamoxifen or raloxifene have been shown to reduce the risk of both breast and ovarian cancer in high-risk women
  • Oral contraceptives can significantly reduce the risk of ovarian cancer

Preventive Surgery

  • Preventive removal of the breasts (mastectomy) significantly reduces the risk of breast cancer
  • Preventive removal of the ovaries and fallopian tubes (salpingo-oophorectomy) significantly reduces the risk of ovarian cancer and may also reduce the risk of breast cancer
*For reference and supporting data on risk factors and medical management visit www.myriadtests.com/references

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Frequently Asked Questions about the BRACAnalysis ® test.

What can I expect during the testing process?
If you and your healthcare provider decide BRACAnalysis is right for you, a small blood or oral rinse sample is taken. This sample is then shipped directly to Myriad Genetic Laboratories. Results can be obtained from your health care provider in about two weeks.
Will my health insurance pay for BRACAnalysis testing?
Most insurance carriers cover genetic testing services for hereditary cancer. In fact, the average patient pays less than $100 coinsurance. Myriad helps you receive the appropriate coverage from your plan and be aware of your financial obligations prior to testing.
Can my health insurance coverage be impacted based on the results?
Federal laws (HIPAA and GINA) and laws in most states prohibit discrimination regarding employment eligibility, health benefits or insurance premiums based solely on genetic information. Additionally, it is Myriad’s policy that test results are disclosed only to the ordering healthcare professional or designee unless the patient consents otherwise.
How can I get more information about hereditary cancer risk assessment and BRACAnalysis testing?
Please talk to your health care provider. You can also visit our website at www.bracnow.com or call Myriad at 866-BRACNOW (866-272-2669).[/one_half] footer

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